Michelle and Jason Mailhot

Fast facts about Harrison Hot Springs

If you're thinking about a daytrip, or maybe a weekend getaway, check out this guide

Harrison Hot Springs is located in the Fraser Valley on the shores of Harrison Lake and is only a 90-minute drive east from Vancouver, and less than three hours north of Seattle.

The quickest route here is via Highway 1, taking exit 135 at Bridal Falls. For a slower pace, enjoy the Scenic 7 Highway through Mission.

Both Abbotsford International and Vancouver International Airports service our area, and docking facilities are available for floatplanes.

 

Fast facts:

 

• Harrison Hot Springs is a provincial and national winner of the prestigious Communities in Bloom competition.

 

• Our local sturgeon can grow over 14 feet in length, and weigh in excess of 1,500 pounds.

 

• Harrison Lake is 60 km long and 900 feet in depth in some areas. It is sparsely populated and boaters are urged to stay tuned into VHF channel 68.

 

• Our hot springs can be enjoyed year round by visiting the indoor public pool, which is sourced by the two hot springs at the south end of the lake.

 

• The Potash spring has a temperature of 120 F and the Sulphur spring is 150 F. View the source by walking along the west side of the lake.

 

• Harrison Hot Springs is a mecca for musicians and artists, who flock to the area each year for the Harrison Festival of the Arts.

 

• Harrison Hot Springs was a point along the Gold Rush trail, and Judge Matthew Begbie named the hot springs the St. Alice Wells, after Alice Douglas, daughter of the British Columbia governor.

 

• Harrison Hot Springs has more than 500 guest rooms and 200 campsites, and is the gateway to the Sasquatch Provincial Park, which includes Deer Lake and Hicks Lake campgrounds.

 

• With the ability to cater to large groups, our hotels are used for thousands of weddings, conventions, awards banquets each year.

 

• First used by members of the Salish First Nations, the soothing effects of our hot springs have drawn people to this area for hundreds of years.