Agassiz Harrison Observer

Dr. Charlie recognized with Diamond Jubilee

Dr. Rose Charlie was honoured with a Queen Elizabeth II Diamond Jubilee Medal last week, in honour of her tireless work spanning almost sixty decades.  - Submitted photo
Dr. Rose Charlie was honoured with a Queen Elizabeth II Diamond Jubilee Medal last week, in honour of her tireless work spanning almost sixty decades.
— image credit: Submitted photo

Dr. Rose Charlie of Sts’Ailes has a long life of achievements to be proud of.

She contributed to the founding of the Union of BC Indian Chiefs in 1969, and formed the BC Association of Non-status Indians, now known as the the United Native Nations. She was also behind the formation of National Indian Brotherhood, now the Assembly of First Nations.

And that’s not all.

Charlie was one of a small group to work to change Section 12 of Canada’s Indian Act, resulting in Bill C-31 in 1985. That historic bill overturned the previous decision that native women who wed white men, and their children, would lose their status.

She is truly a force to be reckoned with, and her work on the Indian Homemaker’s Association and its newspaper, The Indian Voice, is to be commended.

And it has been commended, once again. Charlie received a Queen Elizabeth II Diamond Jubilee Medal last week, presented by Lt. Gov. Judith Guichon at a ceremony in Vancouver. This is in addition to accolades such as an honorary Doctor of Law degree from UBC (1989), Governor General’s award (1994), the Order of British Columbia (2003), the Fraser Basin Council’s Doreen Wright award (2003), the National Year of the Child Award, and a certificate of merit from the Government of Canada.

It’s no wonder then, that Charlie was named among the 100 most influential women in the country  at one point. A widow of a woodcutter and mother of six children with numerous grandchildren, Charlie and her family have at times scrambled to find travel funds so she can attend ceremonies which honour her.

A totem pole stands in Hope in her honour as well. The totem pole is a canoe with four figures representing “white, red, black and Asian figures,” representing that Charlie has always worked with all cultures.

We encourage an open exchange of ideas on this story's topic, but we ask you to follow our guidelines for respecting community standards. Personal attacks, inappropriate language, and off-topic comments may be removed, and comment privileges revoked, per our Terms of Use. Please see our FAQ if you have questions or concerns about using Facebook to comment.

You might like ...

Judges learn about drainage and science on Agassiz tour
 
Mayor candidate: John Allen running for mayor in Harrison Hot Springs
 
Opponents blast pipeline plan ahead of ruling
Water probed at Garden City lands
 
Waste to be tapped as gas
 
Marijuana referendum petition fizzles but campaigners vow to fight on
Council approves 1000 Quayside Drive project
 
Labour consumes most new tax dollars cities collect
 
Charges laid in Willowbrook mall robbery

Community Events, October 2014

Add an Event

Read the latest eEdition

Browse the print edition page by page, including stories and ads.

Oct 30 edition online now. Browse the archives.