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Harrison's Glencoe Hotel noted for historical significance

Andrew Baziuk, owner of the Glencoe Motel, near the heritage marker that states the site
Andrew Baziuk, owner of the Glencoe Motel, near the heritage marker that states the site's historical significance as a private hospital
— image credit: Submitted photo

Some of Harrison Hot Springs' history is being buffed up and shown off, in an effort to teach people more about the community's past.

Historical markers will be placed in areas of significance, as part of an effort by Harrison's Communities in Bloom committee. The first one to receive such a marker is the Glencoe Motel, at the corner of Lillooet Ave. and Hot Springs Road.

The business is currently owned by Andrew and Stephanie Baziuk, however the site housed the first ever private hospital in the province.

It later became the Glencoe Lodge, and in 1920 it became the Glencoe Motel.

The CIB committee has also identified many of the Village's old trees, planted in the early 1900s at the Harrison Resort and Spa.

Thirteen trees have been researched and now bear the botanical signage.

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