Gun amnesty completed

Four rifles, one shot gun and a hand gun collected in Agassiz

The June Gun Amnesty month has now finished, with various unwanted fire arms and weapons being turned in to the four Upper Fraser Valley RCMP Community Police Offices.

Guns and ammunition were accepted in communities across the province, and in the Upper Fraser Valley that totaled 64 firearms. The majority of the total collected came from Chilliwack, where 32 rifles, 15 shot guns and seven hand guns were collected.

In Agassiz, four rifles, one shot gun and one hand gun were collected. In Hope, three rifles and a hand gun were turned in and in Boston Bar, one hand gun.

The Chilliwack Community Police office also had various weaponry turned in, including two cross bows, a long bow, three arrow heads, eight pellet pistols, a marine flare, five knives, and one starter pistol. A variety of fire arms ammunition was also received.

“We are thankful for the co-operation of the public to help make our Communities a safer place to live by disposing of these unwanted weapons and fire arms.” said Cpl. Len vanNieuwenhuizen. “The possibility of these weapons falling into the wrong hands and causing serious harm has been averted. The police are very appreciative of this.”

More than 1,800 firearms, 155 other weapons and about 37,000 rounds of ammunition were turned in to police for destruction at locations across the province.

There was also a six-foot long military-grade missile, kept as a souvenir from a tour of duty overseas, was also turned in by a relative of the keeper.

The program’s goal was to encourage British Columbians to safely dispose of unwanted weapons that might otherwise fall into the hands of criminals, children or others, potentially leading to tragic consequences.