Lake would be ‘back up’ system

Harrison Lake is one of “the most envious water sources in the lower mainland,” says a local councillor. At 40 miles in length, and 5,400 acres, its “pristine water” has even been eyed by other larger governments as a possible aquifer, including the regional district and Mission, says Councillor Allan Jackson.

More importantly, it’s supplied the Village of Harrison with its drinking water for just over 10 years now. An intake system was installed in 2000 when local wells were drying up, he says.

And it’s worked out well, with the water constantly passing the required tests.

But that’s no longer good enough, according provincial health guidelines. The Village was told that they would have to upgrade the lake water system.

A one micron filter would have to be added, at about $450,000, and the intake would have to be extended another kilometre from the shore, which would cost about $1 million. So, the Village decided to explore wells again.

Jackson opposed the idea, saying wells didn’t work before, and won’t work now.

However, Mayor Ken Becotte says that they’ve had some success with some deep water wells near the firehall.

Now, they’ve approved a “demonstration well” in that area, Becotte says.

“We’ve found water that provides the volume we need,” he told The Observer recently. Two wells would be needed to supply the Village and its projected growth, he says.

But in the meantime, they’ve approved the spending and upgrades for the lake water system as well.

“We’ve just put into the budget to do the micron screen, at $450,000,” he says. That work will be done immediately, he says.

“If we look ahead, we could have a full back up system, with the lake as backup and the wells as the full primary system,” he says.

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