EDITORIAL: Better to give

Reporting on food bank donations seems to be the trend this season, and there's a good reason why

Forgive us if the last few editions of this newspaper have been a little heavy on news of charitable donations. But as they say, that’s the kind of month it’s been.

Food drives have done enormously well, even doubling last year’s haul in some cases. Cash donations have been coming in from choir performances, tree sales and every other Christmas-themed event.

And there’s more to come in the next few days, as Christmas Day looms closer.  Today, the students at Kent elementary will walk their bags of donations to the food bank. Tomorrow, the CP Holiday Train will roll into town and present a cheque to Community Services.

This theme of giving just doesn’t seem to stop, and that’s something to be reported on. Not just because it’s wonderful news, but because it’s not always that way. This has been an exceptional year, locally, and the difference is being noted by the Agassiz-Harrison Community Services. They told the newsroom that donations are indeed up 20 per cent this year, and the number is growing.

But there’s a flip side to that good news, too. They remind us that the need for help is also on the rise, with the number of people accessing the local food bank growing continually.

Those are people you know, people you work with, maybe even people in your extended family. They are the working poor, the struggling families and the seniors eeking out their pension.

So here’s something to remember as Santa’s sleigh bells get a little closer. Tossing a can of beans into a donation box is about as simple as clearing out the back of your pantry. And it’ll warm your heart knowing you’ve helped someone in need warm their belly.