Smells like fish in Harrison

Letter writer concerned about tree deforestation in Harrison Hot Springs

Dear Editor,

During the deforestation along Hot Springs Road, (formerly belonging to Peter Kingma), I found it easy to recall back past conversations and observe some mentionable flaws.

Back when the land was originally purchased, Council approved to build on land that “was not originally meant to be developed” – (Ken Becotte), because the land had already been purchased and it was “too difficult to redirect plans” – (Council), however; when the land is resold you approve it again without notice, even when you’re given the opportunity to not.

Then, upon building you approve the minimum riparian zone without a buffer, trees on the inner border of the riparian zone associated with aerial trespass are further cut back turning your original 15m riparian zone to a 14m riparian zone. Once the area has been developed you lose 7m +/- 0.5m to buffer region which leaves you ~7m of functional riparian zone. This zone is dissected by a footpath which severely impairs the ecosystems interactions and viability. On top of this you leave the invasive vegetation, decrease water conservation and promote destruction of any functional habitat. Top-notch Harrison, I applaud you. I’m sure it will all be for the best when you rise to be that economic powerhouse you are striving so hard to become.

It smells like fish in here Harrison, but I give you credit for being so smooth.

Niek de Brouwer

Harrison Hot Springs