The UFV Flood Stories project invites art, writing and spoken submissions about the impact of last year’s floods. The photo shows the area of Marion and Campbell roads on Sumas Prairie in east Abbotsford on Nov. 22, 2021. (Vikki Hopes/Abbotsford News)

The UFV Flood Stories project invites art, writing and spoken submissions about the impact of last year’s floods. The photo shows the area of Marion and Campbell roads on Sumas Prairie in east Abbotsford on Nov. 22, 2021. (Vikki Hopes/Abbotsford News)

Art and writing invited as part of UFV Flood Stories project

Submissions accepted until Nov. 4 for Expressive Arts Contest

Submissions are being accepted until Nov. 4 for an art contest that is part of the Flood Stories project at University of the Fraser Valley (UFV).

Organizers say the Expressive Arts Contest offers an outlet for people to use creativity to process stressful experiences that arose during last year’s floods in the Fraser Valley and other areas of B.C.

The contest is open to schoolchildren – including homeschoolers and students at private schools – from Abbotsford and Chilliwack in kindergarten to Grade 12, as well as UFV students, staff, faculty and alumni.

The Flood Stories project is led by Dr. Michelle Superle, an English professor and research associate with the UFV Food and Agriculture Institute.

RELATED: UFV Food and Agriculture Institute seeking input from Abbotsford, Chilliwack farmers

It invites Fraser Valley farmers and their families who were affected by the November 2021 extreme flooding events to share their experiences in spoken, written and artistic format.

The project uses a narrative approach – developed in consultation with narrative therapy expert Dr. Stephen Madigan – to better understand how Abbotsford farmers have been impacted by the floods and what they need to begin thriving again.

“We recognize that the flood was a very unusual and traumatic experience for many people, both those whose properties flooded and those who observed their fellow citizens undergoing extreme stress,” Superle said.

“We think it’s important, as the first anniversary of the flood approaches, to tell those stories, record them for posterity, and learn from them. Telling their story can also be therapeutic for those affected.”

The Expressive Arts Contest is the final component of the Flood Stories project. Participants will have their artistic projects displayed online and on campus at UFV, as well as other locations throughout Abbotsford.

Entries will be assessed by a jury composed of UFV arts students, with prizes for winners.

Visit ufv.ca and search “Expressive Arts Contest” or “Flood Stories” for more information, including the full criteria.

RELATED: Flood mitigation crucial to preventing future disasters: Senate report on B.C.’s 2021 floods

ArtB.C. Floods 2021

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