Sasquatch researcher Thomas Steenburg speaks to a crowd about his close encounters with the Sasquatch at last year's BC Legends Day at Kilby. The event runs again this Saturday at the historic site in Harrison Mills.

B.C.’s rich, mysterious history brought to life at Kilby

Legends Day features professional Sasquatch researchers and local story tellers

Kilby will come alive this Saturday, with a full day of local history, B.C. ghost stories, Sasquatch folklore and First Nations songs and legends .

Five special speakers have been invited to celebrate the historic site’s second annual BC Legends Day.

Nelson Leon from Sts’ailes will start the day at 11 a.m., with First Nation stories and songs. At noon, Denis LeClerc will speak about Metis Legends in B.C., also through stories and songs.

“Leclerc’s song’s and tales are steeped in BC history, often focusing on events and people who lived during the fur trade,” said Jo-Anne Leon, Kilby Historic Site’s marketing manager. “Leclerc will be seen telling tales of the Métis and early voyageurs here at Kilby.”

Renowned Sasquatch expert John Green is also scheduled to make an appearance during the day, she said. Green lives in the area, and is well known for his lengthy research on all matters relating to the Sasquatch.

“Any serious Sasquatch researcher will agree that this is an excellent opportunity to learn from the legend himself,” she said.

Also speaking about the mysterious creature is author and researcher Thomas Steenburg, who will be on hand for questions and autographs throughout the day.

John Mitchell from BC Ghost Towns is speaking at 2 p.m. on British Columbia’s colonial times, the steam era, fur trade companies and exploration.

And at 4 p.m., Adam McGirr will be speaking about the province’s unknown aquatic animals, such as the Okanagan’s Ogopogo and the Cadborosaurus. McGirr’s slide show will include photos, drawings and the latest theories on advancing lake monster research.

BC Legends Day runs from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m.

For more information on Kilby Historic Site in Harrison Mills, visit www.kilby.ca or call 796-9576.

 

Just Posted

Status quo budget expected for Fraser-Cascade School District

The 2019-20 budget will see few cutbacks, and expects few increases in enrolment

Extra $20K from Harrison for Ranger Station upgrades

Accessibility upgrades to the gallery cost significantly more than originally expected

Fisheries Department announces conservation measures to protect chinook in B.C.

Urgent protection measures include closure of a commercial fishery involving seven endangered stock

Chilliwack Players Guild turns the pages of Anne Frank’s diary

The Chilliwack Players Guild presents The Diary of Anne Frank at the Chilliwack Cultural Centre

Harrison’s Rockwell Drive development moves forward with height increase

Harrison approved a development variance that more than doubled the height limit for the building

VIDEO: Agassiz, Harrison celebrate National Pet Day

From cats and dogs to lizards and chickens, residents showed off the animals that enrich their lives

Prince George sweeps to first-ever BC Hockey League crown

Spruce Kings beat Vernon Vipers 3-1 in the Okanagan Wednesday for 13th straight playoff win

Hwang’s first MLS goal lifts Whitecaps to 1-0 win over LAFC

Vancouver picks up first victory of season

Man identified in Vancouver’s fourth homicide of the year

30-year-old man was not known to police

RCMP locate missing Colony Farm psychiatric patient

Patient left last week on day pass from the hospital in Coquitlam

600 volunteers sign up to recall Maple Ridge MLAs over housing problems

Organizer urges province to reconsider position on Burnett modulars

Child-proof your windows ahead of warm weather: B.C. expert

Fifteen children were taken to BC Children’s Hospital for falls in 2018

B.C. trucker pleads guilty to lesser charges in fatal Manitoba crash

Gurjant Singh was fined $3,000 and given a one-year driving prohibition.

Australian author reacts to Chilliwack school trustee’s ‘book banning’ statements

John Marsden responds to ‘horror and outrage’ from adults about mildly sexual thoughts in his novel

Most Read