Echoes from the past: September 8, 1966

Craft fairs, enrollment and Centennial celebrations

Old Fashioned Crafts To Be Demonstrated At Fall Fair

Three demonstrations of old fashioned crafts will highlight the Centennial aspect of the Agassiz Fall Fair and Corn Festival this Saturday.

At 2 p.m. and 4 p.m a group of ladies headed by Mrs. M Tuyttens will demonstrate quilting.

At 3 p.m. Lew Herman will give a demonstration of horse shoeing and at 3:30 p.m. Mrs.. Jeanne Hope will demonstrate spinning.

For the second year in a row the parade will feature two pipe bands.  Leading off will be the Royal Canadian Legion Pipe Band from Branch 4, Chilliwack.  Chilliwack Junior Band and Kent Junior Pipe band will also participate.

The parade forms up at 10 a.m. for judging and will march off at 11 a.m.  Judging of 4-H entries at the Fair Grounds will also take place at 10 a.m.   The parade route is from the municipal hall down No. 9 Highway and along Pioneer Ave. to the grounds.

Official opening will be at 11:30 a.m.. Rev. A.B. Patterson M.P. is scheduled to do the honors, but his presently in Ottawa, where Parliament is holding a special session.  The opening will be followed by welcoming addresses by Reeve Wes Johnson of Kent, Chairman Mel Geyer of Harrison Hot Springs, Agricultural Association President Lloyd Tranmer and Chamber of Commerce president Bert Nilsson.

Les Russell, Rosedale, will crown the Corn King.  Al Fraser will be master of ceremonies, assisted by Fred Maurer.

Parade winners will be announced at 12:15 immediately after the crowing of the Corn King.  Fair buildings will then be opened, and dinner will e served by the Agassiz United Church Women.  Judging of livestock starts at 12:30 p.m. and children’s racing at 1:30.  The gymkhana begins at 2 o`clock.

Evening entertainment starts at 7 p.m.with Ukrainian dancing by a group of eight dancers from Whalley who have previously performed at the Peace Arch, the Kitsilano Showboat, Vernon and the P.N.E. and who won the Burnaby Talent Show.

Auction of exhibits is at 8 p.m. and the  fireworks display is at 8:45.  Starting at 10 p.m. there will be dancing in the Agricultural Hall to the music of the Country Gentlemen.  Draw for the calf will take place at midnight.  The mid way will be open from noon to midnight.

 

Increase Of 21 Pupils Shown In First-Day Enrollment Figures.

First day enrollment in Agassiz School District on Tuesday was 889, an increase of 21 over the comparable figure last year, and an even greater increase over the number attending last June.

Agassiz school has 445 pupils, from Grade 5 up, just three more than last year. Most of the higher grades have less pupils than last year, but Grade Eight has jumped from sixty pupils to 75, requiring three classes for the first time in the history of the district.

Harrison Hot Springs school has 86 pupils, up six; McCaffrey has 65, up 14; Kent has 234, up 49; Harrison River 38, up two; Bear Creek 14, up two; and Spring Creek seven.

Most of the increase at Kent is the kindergarten, with 46 pupils.  Last year it started the term at the Anglican Church Hall.  Six Grade One pupils are to be shifted from McCaffrey to Kent to reduce the size of the Grade one and two class there, which now has 36 pupils.

 

By-Law Vote Set September On $36,500 For Centennial Plan

Kent municipal council held a special meeting Tuesday evening to give first three reading to a by-law authorizing borrowing of $36,500 to pay the municipal share of the Centennial project.

The matter is to be put before the voters on Saturday, September 24.

Money is to be repaid over a 15 year period, costing abut $3,700 a year, which is equivalent to a mill on the present assessment.

The project is a dining hall, kitchen and washrooms to be constructed in Centennial Park. Voting is timed after the Fall Fair, so that the Centennial Committee can outline its plans with a display at the fair.

Council also voted to buy one acre from Allan Bates to extend the parking area beside the Agricultural Hall.  Money was already set aside in the budget.

Painting of the municipal hall was discussed, and light brown coral shade chose for the upper part of the building, which is now a faded yellow.  The lower part, now grey, will be a grey-brown shade.

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