Join the walk for wildlife

Residents across Canada will be walking for wildlife in May

The Canadian Wildlife Federation (CWF) is hosting its fifth annual Walk for Wildlife.  Kicking off during National Wildlife Week (April 6-12), the Walk For Wildlife campaign runs until International Day of Biodiversity, May 22 and gives people across the country an opportunity to show their support for conservation while making time to connect with nature themselves.

This year’s goal is to raise awareness and funds for species at risk, like the burrowing owl.

Burrowing owls, one of the smallest members of the owl family, were once common in western Canada. Today, they are listed as endangered by the Committee on the Status of Endangered Wildlife in Canada. In spite of recovery efforts, this little owl has grown even scarcer. The reasons for its decline include habitat loss and fragmentation, lack of suitable prey, environmental contaminants, and other hardships on its breeding grounds in Canada and on its wintering range in Central and South America.

Through Canadian Wildlife Federation’s Endangered Species Program, CWF has been working to conserve species at risk like burrowing owls and their habitats for future generations through research and recovery support, advocacy and awareness.

Becoming part of the Walk for Wildlife is easy. Participants can visit WalkforWildlife.ca to register, start collecting pledges, then head out to a local park, nature trail or conservation area and spend some in the wild.  People can take part informally with family and friends or head out with a local organization by joining in one of the #Walk for Wildlife events listed on the website. For every pledge received, participants will become part of the CWF loyalty program and receive special rewards. Those who raise $100 or more will receive a special Burrowing owl t-shirt. Top fundraiser will have a chance to win a trip for two to Calgary for a special conservation experience at the Calgary Zoo. For those who just want to head outdoors for some quality time in nature, they can log their Walk for Wildlife on the interactive on-line map.

“As Canadians, we are very fortunate to be surrounded by a rich diversity of wildlife. Sadly, many of the species that make up this diversity are at risk because of human and environmental pressures,” says Wade Luzny, CEO and Executive Vice-President of the Canadian Wildlife Federation. “Walk for Wildlife is an opportunity to inspire and connect thousands of Canadians to nature and wildlife. And this year, we’re dedicating Walk for Wildlife to species at-risk, like the burrowing owl.”

About Walk for Wildlife

Walk for Wildlife is a national campaign that encourages all Canadians to get outside and experience the wildlife and natural spaces in their backyards. From the beginning of National Wildlife Week on April 6 until the International Day for Biological Diversity on May 22, help CWF raise awareness and funds for species at-risk, like the burrowing owl. These species have found themselves on the endangered species list and under the protection of the Species at Risk Act (SARA) and need our help.

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