The kids from the Youth Inclusion Program traveled to Cache Creek to shoot some of the scenes for their recently debuted sci-fi flick Night of the Crash.

Sci-fi flick debuts on big screen

Agassiz and Hope's Youth Inclusion Program kids worked on movie for 18 months

A team of local filmmakers rented out a screen at Cottonwood Cinemas in Chilliwack last Thursday, to debut their first short feature film.

And before the opening credits rolled across the screen, that team of actors, writers, make up artists are more, all gathered at the front of the theatre to take a bow. About 20 attended the screening, and all are members of the Youth Inclusion Program — an Agassiz and Hope program, partially funded through the Government of Canada’s National Crime Prevention Strategy.

YIP has accomplished some wonderful goals, modeling positive behavior for kids ages eight to 18 through activities including hiking, camping and most recently, film making.

The 38 minute short feature, a sci-fi piece titled Night of the Crash, took about 18 months to complete, said program coordinator Adam Palmer.

In total, about 40 people were involved, as they moved in and out of the program. With Palmer directing, the film evolved from the kids’ initial ideas into the film shown on Thursday night. The theatre was packed with supporters of the kids, and supporters of the program, and by the end of the night, a huge round of applause filled the air.

After a few minor changes, Night of the Crash will be entered into film festivals. It will become a lasting legacy for YIP, Palmer said.

Night of the Crash takes place years after a global war, Palmer says. An infection spreads across the planet where the old die and the young live. Isolated groups of young survivors live together. Then, the visitors came. They came from the sky. At first, seen as a threat, the young learn the sky people came to help. Some believe and some do not.

Night of the Crash explores the lives of the young who survive a global disaster. They are the young people who have the courage to look past their fear of the unknown and search for new ways to cope with conflict and disaster. A story that takes us on a journey through the lives of the disenfranchised, Night of the Crash brings us into a world of young people willing to risk their lives to overcome conflicts passed down by generations of ignorance and fear.

“They came up with a more meaningful story than I could have ever written,” Palmer said.

The film was shot all around the Fraser Cascade region and beyond, with scenes in Cache Creek and Alexandria bridge. They met once a week to work on the film, writing, directing, acting, shooting and making props and working out set design.

The Youth Inclusion Program is a pilot project and relies on funding and support from government and community partners.

For more information on YIP, phone 604-796-2585.

news@ahobserver.com

 

 

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