Shoreline cleanup netted 75 pounds of garbage in HHS

Streamkeepers invite public to help clean up Miami River

It is time for the annual Great Canadian Shoreline Cleanup in Harrison Hot Springs. The Miami River Streamkeepers Society is hosting a cleanup from 10 a.m. to noon on Saturday, Sept. 27 to celebrate BC’s Rivers Day, founded by Mark Angelo in 1980. In 2012, in B.C. 24,653 registrants at 747 sites cleaned 1,249.6 km of shoreline. This

This is the 21st anniversary of the cleanup. The shoreline cleanup originated in 1994 when a few people from the Vancouver Aquarium cleaned the beaches around Stanley Park. Shoreline debris is dangerous to people, wildlife and to environmental health.

Although smoking related debris is the most common contaminant, plastic debris from shoreline activities floats in “garbage patches” in all the world’s oceans with the North Pacific gyre being a soup of plastic trash covering an area the size of the province of Quebec. Every plastic item discarded into Harrison Lake or the Miami River eventually finds it way there.

Seventy-five pounds of trash was picked up from the shoreline and from in the Miami River last year including one bag of recyclable cans and bottles. Since 2012, the Village has dedicated Village workers for trash pickup several evenings a week in summer.

From the Miami River last year, two large plastic tarps and a Real Estate sign were recovered from the Miama in the short distance from the Fred Hardy Bridge to the launching site.  The Streamkeepers will again target this section. The Village’s canoe and kayak site launching is at the south end of Maple Street.

Wild Safe BC will be joining the Streamkeepers at the Harrison Lake Plaza. Last year their bear claws generated much interest. The Streamkeepers will display information on stewardship, invasive plants and species of conservation concern.

Give up two hours of your time on Sunday, Sept. 27 to assist keeping our shorelines clean.

Register at the Harrison Lake Plaza at 10 a.m. All participants must sign a waiver and should wear sturdy shoes. Bring small used bags and gloves. Large garbage bags and disposal gloves are available. All garbage collected is itemized and weighed and the results submitted to the GCSC.  Refreshments available. Contact Janne Perrin, Site Coordinator, at 604-796-9182 or go to www.shorelinecleanup.ca for more information.

 

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