Watercolour artist Alice Bottrill (left) stands with one of her steam train paintings with Agassiz-Harrison Museum curator Charlotte Murray. Bottrill’s paintings will be on display until Nov. 19. (Adam Louis/Observer)

Watercolour artist Alice Bottrill (left) stands with one of her steam train paintings with Agassiz-Harrison Museum curator Charlotte Murray. Bottrill’s paintings will be on display until Nov. 19. (Adam Louis/Observer)

Trains at the Station: Agassiz-Harrison Museum hosts steam train painting exhibit

Alice Bottrill is a watercolour artist who recently moved to the area

A North Vancouver artist and her watercolour trains have pulled in to a new home in Agassiz-Harrison.

Alice Bottrill’s artistic ode to the might steam train is on display at the Agassiz-Harrison Museum until Nov. 19.

While Bottrill’s work covers a variety of subjects, she said she’s painted more than 100 steam trains, which can take anywhere from a speedy 45 minutes to a couple of weeks. Bottrill jokes that her paintings have traveled farther than she has; while most of them are in galleries and homes all over the world, the paintings on display at the museum are her private collection. Her fascination with trains traces back to her childhood in China.

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Bottrill’s list of credentials is long and prestigious. She is an elected member and regional director of the Canadian Society of Painters in Watercolor and a member of the Federation of Canadian Artists and International Watercolor Society of Canada, just to name a few.

Bottrill has plans for teaching art in the area and has kept herself plenty busy during the pandemic, saying she never really felt lonely thanks to her art.

“The process of making art is isolation,” she said. “(There wasn’t) any problem with me being alone. The world is within you.”

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To Bottrill, living in Agassiz-Harrison is an artist’s dream.

“It’s a very therapeutic place,” she said.”I always wanted something tranquil, peaceful, friendly and safe. I drove thousands of miles looking for a place. I drove east, and by the time I stopped in Harrison, I said, that’s it. I’m not going to look any further. That’s my destination.”

The Agassiz-Harrison Museum is open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Wednesday through Saturday.

See more of Alice Bottrill’s art online at nsartists.ca/alicebottrill.

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