New mobile radio protocols on track for Fraser Valley resource roads

The Chilliwack Natural Resource District will be implementing new resource road radio channels beginning Nov. 16.

New mobile radio communication protocols are being  implemented throughout B.C. to improve safety for resource road users. The changes include new standardized road signs, radio call protocols and a bank of standardized mobile radio channels. The Chilliwack Natural Resource District will be implementing new resource road radio channels beginning Nov. 16, 2015.

The district covers approximately 1.4 million hectares and is the most densely populated forest district in the province. The district extends from Metro Vancouver in the west to Manning Park in the east, Boston Bar to the north and the United States border to the south.

The new protocols will impact forest service roads and other road permit roads in the area. All affected road users must have the new channels programmed into their mobile radios before the transition dates. Mobile radio users are advised to retain current radio channels and frequencies until they are no longer required.

It is recommended that mobile radio users have the full bank of standardized resource road radio channels programmed into their radios by certified radio technicians.

New signs posted on local resource roads will advise which radio channels to use and provide the communication protocols, including the road name and required calling intervals. Vehicle operators using mobile radios to communicate their location and direction of travel must use the posted radio channels and call protocols.

All resource road users in the affected areas should exercise additional caution during the transition period. Drivers are reminded that forest service roads are radio-assisted, not radio- controlled,

and to drive safely according o road and weather conditions.

Local resource road safety committees have worked with the Ministry of Forests, Lands and Natural Resource Operations and Industry Canada to implement these changes.

Learn more about resource road radio communications protocols and  view maps online at:  www.for.gov.bc.ca/hth/engineering/Road_Radio_Project.htm or bycontacting Industry Canada at 1 800 667-3780.

Just Posted

Fraser Valley fire departments form ‘strike teams’ to combat wildfires

Boston Bar, Chilliwack River Valley and Popkum departments form strike teams to fight wildfires

Sometimes it’s okay to simply try

I feel like a success even though I failed at donating blood

‘Beauty amongst such tragedy:’ B.C. photographer captures nature’s trifecta

David Luggi’s photo from a beach in Fraser Lake shows Shovel Lake wildfire, Big Dipper and an aurora

Air quality advisory continues in the Lower Mainland

Smoke from Interior fires brings fine particulate

Canadians fear for relatives trapped amid flooding in Indian state of Kerala

More than 800,000people have been displaced by floods and landslides

IndyCar driver Wickens flown to hospital after scary crash

IndyCar said Wickens was awake and alert as he was taken to a hospital

Ex-BCTF president ‘undeterred’ after early release from pipeline protest jail term

Susan Lambert and Order of Canada recipient Jean Swanson released early

Fast food chains look to capitalize on vegetarian, vegan trend with new items

Seven per cent of Canadians consider themselves vegetarians and 2.3 per cent identify as vegans

B.C. swimmer halts journey across Strait of Juan de Fuca after hypothermia sets in

Victoria MS athlete Susan Simmons swam for eight-and-a-half hours in 9 C choppy waters

‘Hard on water:’ Smoke not the only long-range effect of wildfires

The project began more than 10 years ago after southern Alberta’s 2003 Lost Creek fire

B.C. VIEWS: Genuine aboriginal rights are misused and discredited

Camp Cloud one of long line of protests falsely asserting title

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau to march in Montreal’s Pride parade

Trudeau will end the day in his home riding of Papineau

Most Read