These little yellow fish are being painted at storm drains throughout Harrison Hot Springs. The Miami River Streamkeepers Society hopes they serve as a reminder that storm drains go directly into the Miami River and to be aware of what is put through the drain. (Photo/Janne Perrin)

These little yellow fish are being painted at storm drains throughout Harrison Hot Springs. The Miami River Streamkeepers Society hopes they serve as a reminder that storm drains go directly into the Miami River and to be aware of what is put through the drain. (Photo/Janne Perrin)

What are those little yellow fish? Miami River Streamkeepers can answer

The painted yellow fish will appear at every storm drain

It’s one thing to paint the town red, but it’s quite another to paint the town yellow.

Little, bright yellow fish have appeared at storm drains throughout Harrison Hot Springs. These fish are the work of the Miami River Streamkeepers Society (MRSS), who painted the golden fish to remind the public that all storm drains empty into the Miami River.

MRSS member Janne Perrin told The Observer in an email that these fish were meant to be repainted for quite some time, but pandemic-related restrictions prevented the repainting of existing fish and the painting of new fish at new subdivisions throughout the village.

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“Storm drains collect runoff from roads and parking lots and empty into the Miami River,” Perrin stated. “Runoff does not go into the domestic sewage system. People who do not realize this often allow oil, swimming pool water, and other toxic household or industrial compounds to get into storm drains.”

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The runoff from the roads contain sediment, oil, particles from car exhaust and other materials that prove harmful to the ecosystem along the Miami River.

Members of MRSS haven’t completed their mission as they are waiting on a new supply of yellow paint from the Fisheries and Oceans community advisor. Those interested in painting can find out about the next session online at www.miamiriverstreamkeepers.ca or leave a message with Perrin at 604-796-9182.

MRSS has partnered with the village of Harrison Hot Springs in environmental restoration and awareness projects since 2006. These projects include removing trash, planting indigenous plants and caring for the local ecosystem.


@adamEditor18
adam.louis@ ahobserver.com

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