Visit the online information website bc211.ca to find local resources in your community.

Do you struggle with the 5 common concerns of the ‘Sandwich Generation’?

bc211.ca is the one-stop link to the information you need

Nine-in-10 British Columbians of the so-called “sandwich generation” – those juggling the needs of both children and aging parents – report challenges in providing care, a BC-wide Insights West poll suggests.

But help is at hand by dialing 2-1-1 or online at bc211.ca, linking residents to a wide range of services, from health and wellness to housing and legal support.

5 common concerns faced by family caregivers

The toll of family responsibilities adds up. More than half of Insights West respondents said busy schedules make finding time to visit aging parents difficult; 60 per cent reported challenges in keeping informed about a parent’s health status and 56 per cent in affording the costs associated with caring.

Health Care – Whether it’s help with a child’s learning challenge or a parent’s acute illness, let the help line 2-1-1 or bc211.ca connect you with the people who can help. Find information about home care, health conditions, day programs and more, all easily accessed through the one-stop website. Topics are also tailored to aboriginal, immigrant and senior and youth communities, making it simple to access the information you need.

Housing – Helping a parent downsize or transition into assisted living is a big step for both of you, one potentially wrought with emotional and practical challenges. 2-1-1 or bc211.ca offers connections to residences, home support, financial services and more. And if B.C.’s tight housing market is adding to your family stress, find links to those solutions, too.

Mental health – Depression, anxiety and stress are common among those trying to balance caring for a young family and aging parents. A simple call to 2-1-1 provides a confidential resource to counsellors, organizations and other mental health professionals in your community. If your parent is isolated, perhaps following the loss of a partner, 2-1-1 or bc211.ca can also connect them with local social and recreation opportunities.

Addiction – If the stress of caregiving while raising a young family has you trying to cope by reaching for alcohol or drugs, know you’re not alone. Others may worry for a parent drinking heavily in face of social isolation or a child experimenting with street drugs. Regardless of your situation, find help and support by calling 2-1-1 or visiting bc211.ca.

Emergencies – From childhood injuries to a parent’s sudden acute illness – not to mention health concerns common among exhausted caregivers themselves – emergency situations can quickly overwhelm. When circumstances arise, the help line 2-1-1 or bc211.ca will help you find the information – and solutions – you need.

One-stop link to the information you need

Created in partnership with United Way, bc211 connects individuals 24/7 with current, reliable information about community resources close to home. The multilingual help line is available 24/7 by dialing 2-1-1 (phone service is available in the Lower Mainland, Fraser Valley and on Vancouver Island). Online, help is a click away at bc211.ca right across the province. It’s optimized for mobile devices so you can access information at home or on the go. Or you can chat online at bc211.ca daily from 8 a.m. to 11 p.m.

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