The downtown area of Agassiz underwent a massive change for many months for the filming of Wayward Pines. The District of Kent is looking for legacy project ideas as a way to commemorate the massive filming project.

Agassiz Harrison museum getting cash for walkway project

Kent council decision follows public input into Wayward Pines spending

A small portion of the Wayward Pines revenue has been set aside for the Agassiz Harrison Museum, following an unpopular decision to use the money for a mobile stage.

At Monday’s meeting, council voted unanimously to give the museum $22,500 toward the Agassiz Historical Society’s wish list. The money will help to pay for the number one item on the list — a new walkway and railing for visitors.

The museum building, which is owned by the District of Kent, is need of several repairs and has been seeking funds from various sources to get the work done.

The walkway will cost $20,000 and the railing cost $2,500.

The District of Kent earned $309,500 in extra revenue from the production company that shot the television show, Wayward Pines. Council had previously voted to buy a mobile stage to help enhance local events and to possibly increase the opportunities for cultural events. That decision proved to be unpopular with some residents, who criticized the purchase and asked council to consider other projects that need funding. Council went back to the drawing board, and asked the community for more input.

Wayward Pines public meeting

Agassiz residents were invited to give input on how to spend revenue earned by Wayward Pines filming activity. OBSERVER FILE PHOTO

 

Some of other items discussed needing the District’s attention and funding included the ball diamond washrooms, the Kent Municipal Cemetery, and a reserve fund to get a spray park built.

The remainder of the funds are being held in reserve, to be spent in the near future on a ‘legacy project.’

“I don’t think we need to spent it all immediately,” said Mayor John Van Laerhoven. “But we need to spend it while we remember what Wayward Pines was, so it is indeed a legacy.”

Council agreed unanimously to the motion, which was put forward by Councillor Darcy Striker. New councillor Susan Spaeti noted that she toured the museum to see their need for repairs so she could have a better understanding prior to voting.

news@ahobserver.com

 

 

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