The access road to a proposed quarry is located off Hot Springs Road. The area itself would be located up a rock hill side, 270 metres away from the closest home and the nearest residential water source.

Application sent to province for quarry operations between Agassiz and Harrison

Village has requested a public hearing

CORRECTION: An earlier version of this story stated that the proposed area for the quarry is in an area of land zoned ‘agricultural.’ In fact this area of land is located on land zoned as ‘resource management,’ which allows for operations such as mining. An earlier version of this story also stated that the ‘notice of work’ ad was placed in the April 5 edition of the Observer when it was placed in the March 29 edition.

Intermittent drilling, blasting, extracting and crushing could be the new norm for a property between Agassiz and Harrison.

Development companies partnered under the name TC Merritt Valley Farms are making an application to the provincial government to build a quarry near Hot Springs Road where activities would include blasting sand and gravel and other “quarry operations.”

The operations would take place between 7 a.m. and 5 p.m. from Monday to Friday –with an end date listed as Dec. 31, 2030, based on an initial planned start date of sometime in 2017.

The application said the site is located 430 metres from the nearest public road and “has not many homes around it since it is located on agricultural land surrounded by large parcels of land.”

The shortest distance to the nearest home and residential water source is 270 metres.

“The site is a raised terrace well above the highway and housed to the east. Crushing equipment will not be heard from the highway, and blasting will be limited as per demand. Once or twice a week,” reads the application.

It also mentions plans to plant trees along the property line to minimize “visual impacts.”

The application estimates that 120,000 tonnes a year will be extracted from the seven-hectare area located up a hillside between the two municipalities.

The decision is ultimately up to the province, but the Village of Harrison has expressed concerns about the proposed operations and informed The Observer that it has sent a letter to the province requesting a public hearing.

Harrison resident Michie Vidal has reservations too. She recalled living near a mining operation in Lake Errock, and said dust and noise were an ongoing issue.

“My experience dealing with the aggregate site in Lake Errock is … they will blast anytime they choose to,” she said. “There could also be additional traffic.”

The application does detail measures to minimize dust impacts such as a layer of gravel on the service road that will be kept wet over the summer.

As far as implications for groundwater, the average depth to the high groundwater table at the proposed excavation area is 95 metres – and no fuel or explosives would be stored on site.

The application also states that no First Nation groups have been consulted on the proposed project.

Many locals have indicated to The Observer that they are not only opposed to this operation, but are mobilizing to stop it.

A “notice of work” ad placed in the March 29 edition of The Observer states that anyone affected by or interested in more information on the application has 30 days to express concerns to the chief inspector of mines from the Ministry of Energy, Mines and Petroleum Resources c/o Southwest Region.

Just Posted

Fundraiser for teenager hit by car in Rosedale

Teen suffering multiple fractures and blood clots following incident on Yale Road

Vedder River cleanup nets bag of discarded sex toys

Chilliwack volunteers stumble on unexpected find while removing 600 lbs of trash from riverway

Hikers alert after woman approached by suspicious man in Harrison Mills

The woman and her family were hiking in the wetlands between Rowena’s Inn and Sts’ailes First Nation

Chilliwack International Spring Film Series returns to Cottonwood 4 Cinemas

Put a spring in your step with the Chilliwack International Spring Film Series’ feature titles

EDITORIAL: No think-tank report cards for the Observer

Fraser Institute’s annual school ranking isn’t a good measure of success, editor Grace Kennedy writes

Film crews descend on Agassiz for ‘Republic of Sarah’

Pioneer Avenue will be closed to traffic Monday and Tuesday

Father-son duo at B.C. Children’s Hospital helps new dads fight depression

The pair teamed up to introduce the only known research-based mindfulness workshop for new dads

Mexican restaurant in B.C. told to take down Mexican flag

General manager of Primo’s Mexican Grill in White Rock: ‘I’ve never heard of anything like this’

B.C. NDP moves to provide tax credits, tax cut for LNG Canada

Provincial sales tax break of $596 million repayable after construction

COLUMN: Smart phone too powerful a tool to yank from students’ hands

Rather than ban them from schools, let’s teach kids to harness their phone’s power and use it properly

Trudeau sells housing plan in visit to hot real estate market in B.C.

Trudeau said the budget contains measures to help first-time buyers

Norway opens probe into why cruise ship ventured into storm

The Viking Sky was headed for southern Norway when it had engine problems on Saturday afternoon

Crash threatens Vancouver shipyard’s schedule for new coast guard ships

The delivery of the vessel was already years overdue

Fired B.C. farmland commission chair backs NDP rule changes

Richard Bullock agrees with Lana Popham, ALC records don’t

Most Read