Matt Astifan and his son, Marcus. (Facebook)

B.C. man says he was evicted due to ‘personal vendetta’ against his toddler

Matt Astifan says he has tried to do what he can but a young child will always make some noise

A New Westminster man has 10 days to get out of his apartment after what he calls a “personal vendetta” against his two-year-old.

Matt Astifan, who lives in a family-friendly apartment with his partner, Mary, and his son, Marcus, is frustrated with a Rental Tenancy Board decision allowing eviction for the noise made by the young boy.

In a Facebook post on Jan.21, Astifan says the issue started on in January 2018, after management complained their toddler was running in the hallways at night to “burn off his energy” before bed.

Astifan says they stopped letting Marcus run outside their apartment.

Nine days later, Astifan’s downstairs neighbour complained about “ridiculous” noise.

In a letter from management, the neighbour noted “stomping with shoes, dragging of things (toys) across the floor, continual running… and banging that disrupts us every single day and into the late evenings.”

Astifan says management seemed somewhat sympathetic, and he added rugs in the unit, kept shoes off inside, and didn’t allow playing with toy cars on the hardwood floor.

In July, a new set of downstairs neighbours complained about Marcus running around late at night.

“Why a three-year-old is up and running around past 9:30 p.m. is beyond me, but as these are the second neighbours bringing up this issue. You’ll need to find a solution,” Shoreline Building Manager Serge Rondeau wrote in an email to Astifan, which he provides access to in the Facebook post.

“I will be issuing written notices from now on, and it’s not because you guys are not good tenants, as you are, but because I need to do what I can to make new tenants comfortable.”

Astifan says he told Rondeau not to expect any significant changes “since there isn’t much more we can do about it.”

His partner, Mary, wrote a letter saying the family does not want to escalate, but that under the Residential Tenancy Act, children have the right to make a reasonable amount of noise.

“We have the right not to be harassed and threatened with eviction and notices for regular child noise like walking, trotting, playing and running,” she said.

“We try to put him on schedule and sleep before 8 but yes, [toddlers] do stay up after 9:30 sometimes because he is not a robot, he has tantrums, moods and sometimes refuses to sleep.”

Noise complaints and written notices continued until Nov. 27, when management sent an eviction notice requesting Astifan and his family move out by Jan. 31.

“We have been targeted and harassed by the building managers for months now, through their abuse of power as our property managers, they are trying to force us out of our home,” Astifan wrote.

“They have ignored our complaints regarding the tenant below us banging on his ceiling, screaming at me from his patio and smoking on his patio, while taking massive action against our family to the point of this unsubstantiated eviction notice.”

READ MORE: North Delta renters fight eviction over pets

READ MORE: South Surrey RV residents dispute legality of eviction

Astifan appealed the notice with the Residential Tenancy Branch, which found the landlords have made every reasonable attempt to resolve the issue and could evict the family.

“The landlords in this matter have other families living in the building, which have not been evicted for children playing,” wrote arbitrator A. Wood in their Jan. 21 decision.

“The landlords have relocated a previous occupant due to the ongoing noise from the tenant’s rental unit and have even offered the tenant living accommodation more suitable for the tenant’s family, which was not accepted by the tenant.”

Astifan cannot appeal the decision.

A request for comment from the apartment management company has not yet been returned.


@katslepian

[email protected]

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

TRAFFIC: VIDEO: Truck crash halts Highway 1 traffic in Langley

Left lane blocked after truck crashes into median by 264th Street

Set in Stone: Harrison Hot Springs carver looks back on long career

Werner Streicek hopes to see his art in public display soon.

SD 78 approves budget for 2019-2020

No changes to the bottom line, unanimous approval

Tick season begins in Hope, says local veterinary clinic

Vet clinic helping track Lyme disease across country

VIDEO: Harrison sculptor/carver shows off his work

Werner Streicek has been sculpting for 25 years in Harrison Hot Springs

Fashion Fridays: Tammy’s big makeover

Kim XO, helps to keep you looking good on Fashion Fridays on the Black Press Media Network

Notorious B.C. fugitive to be extradited from California on murder charge

Brandon Nathan Teixeira submitted to extradition during court proceedings Thursday in Sacramento

Canada prepared to monitor for community spread of COVID-19: Tam

The U.S. confirmed one case of the new coronavirus, or COVID-19, in California Thursday

Decade-long health care battle draws to a close today in B.C.

Dr. Brian Day began his battle a decade ago against the B.C. government

Speaker ‘will not tolerate illegal activity’ on B.C. legislature grounds, says chief of staff

Chief of staff to the B.C. speaker Alan Mullen says situation with demonstrators appears ‘fluid’

Conservative MP questions whether rail blockades constitute terrorism

Crown-Indigenous Relations Minister Carolyn Bennett travelled to B.C. to meet Indigenous leaders

Lawsuit over African mine can be heard in British Columbia: Supreme Court

B.C. courts dismissed Nevsun’s attempts to make Eritrea the forum for any lawsuit proceedings

Clothing, jewelry, purses: RCMP ask court about disposal of evidence in Robert Pickton case

Pickton was sentenced to life with no chance of parole for 25 years for the murders of six women

Ryan nets hat trick in return as Senators beat Canucks 5-2

Ottawa winger received assistance for admitted alcohol problem

Most Read