Tim Takaro seen in a tree in New Westminster, B.C., on Aug. 4, 2020 in protest of the Trans Mountain pipeline. (Jef Bradshaw/Contributed)

Tim Takaro seen in a tree in New Westminster, B.C., on Aug. 4, 2020 in protest of the Trans Mountain pipeline. (Jef Bradshaw/Contributed)

B.C. scientist, 63, protests in trees set to be removed for Trans Mountain pipeline

Tim Takaro is reaching new heights as he tries to stall the pipeline expansion project in New Westminster

With a big sign reading “Stop TMX,” a Vancouver-area professor spent all of Tuesday (Aug. 4) perched in a tree in New Westminster as part of an effort to block construction of the Trans Mountain pipeline expansion project.

“I didn’t expect to find myself living in a tree at 63 years of age,” Tim Takaro said in a statement released by activist group Extinction Rebellion.

Takaro is currently occupying a section of forested area along the Brunette River which is scheduled to be removed to clear way for pipeline to be laid.

“I am a public health physician who has been studying and working on policy regarding the health impacts of climate change for nearly 30 years,” he said.

“This threat has compelled me to put my body on the line to prevent construction of this climate-killing project.”

The group is planning a physically distanced march on Wednesday afternoon in New Westminster. Black Press Media has reached out to New Westminster police and Kinder Morgan for comment.

ALSO READ: Protesters lock themselves to Washington port to block Trans Mountain pipeline shipment

The latest protest by Takaro comes just days after the Trudeau government and Alberta officials signed an agreement through which the feds will lessen environmental monitoring of oilsands due to budget cuts amid the ongoing pandemic.

Signed July 7 by top bureaucrats in Ottawa and Edmonton, it reduces funding by about 25 per cent from last year’s budget, according to documents obtained by the Canadian Press.

ALSO READ: Trans Mountain pipeline expansion cost jumps 70% to $12.6 billion

The Trans Mountain expansion – bought by the federal government in 2018 – is expected to triple the pipeline’s capacity to carry bitumen from Edmonton to Burnaby. The controversial project was approved for a second time in June 2019, after the Federal Court of Appeal tore up the original approval last year due to insufficient environmental review and inadequate Indigenous consultations.

Last month, the Supreme Court of Canada decided not to hear five challenges from environment and Indigenous groups from B.C.

READ MORE: B.C. First Nations vow to keep fighting after Trans Mountain pipeline appeal denied

– With files from The Canadian Press


@ashwadhwani
ashley.wadhwani@bpdigital.ca

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

Want to support local journalism? Make a donation here.

Pipelineprotest

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

Students at the Chilliwack campus of the University of the Fraser Valley. (Darren MacDonald/ UFV)
UFV asking students to voluntarily report COVID cases and exposures to the school

With COVID cases rising and Fraser Health struggling to keep up, students are asked to help

Bev Kennedy of the Agassiz-Harrison Historical Society board of directors demonstrates tongue-in-cheek how to hold a tea cup for guests at the fifth annual Dickens Tea fundraiser at Cheam Village Saturday afternoon.
Un-Dickens Tea on tap for Agassiz Harrison Museum

Deadline for order placement is Nov. 28.

UFV is seeking data from local farmers with the aim to help improve food systems regionally. (File photo)
UFV Food and Agriculture Institute seeking input from Abbotsford, Chilliwack farmers

Date gathered from survey aims to help improve food systems regionally in the Fraser Valley

The board room of the Fraser Valley Regional District. (FVRD)
Jason Lum re-elected for fifth term as chair of the Fraser Valley Regional District

The inaugural meeting of the Fraser Valley Regional District Board went ahead on Nov. 25

B.C. Health Minister Adrian Dix and provincial health officer Dr. Bonnie Henry update the COVID-19 situation at the B.C. legislature, Nov. 23, 2020. (B.C. government)
B.C. sets another COVID-19 record with 887 new cases

Another 13 deaths, ties the highest three days ago

A big job: Former forests minister Doug Donaldson stands before a 500-year-old Douglas fir in Saanich to announce preservation of some of B.C.’s oldest trees, July 2019. (B.C. government)
B.C. returning to ‘stand-alone’ forests, rural development ministry

Horgan says Gordon Campbell’s super-ministry doesn’t work

Despite rumours, Surrey RCMP say they are not issuing tickets to people if they are driving in a vehicle with others from a different household. (File photo)
COVID-19 tickets: No, RCMP aren’t checking vehicle occupancies, restaurant tables

Enforcement about education, not punishment says Surrey RCMP Cpl. Joanie Sidhu

Alexandre Bissonnette, who pleaded guilty to a mass shooting at a Quebec City mosque, arrives at the courthouse in Quebec City on February 21, 2017. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Mathieu Belanger - POOL
Court strikes down consecutive life sentences; mosque shooter has prison term cut

The decision was appealed by both the defence and the Crown

Join Black Press Media and Do Some Good
Join Black Press Media and Do Some Good

Pay it Forward program supports local businesses in their community giving

Cannabis bought in British Columbia (Ashley Wadhwani/Black Press Media)
Is it time to start thinking about greener ways to package cannabis?

Packaging suppliers are still figuring eco-friendly and affordable packaging options that fit the mandates of Cannabis Regulations

Gold medallists in the ice dance, free dance figure skating Tessa Virtue and Scott Moir, of Canada, pose during their medals ceremony at the 2018 Winter Olympics in Pyeongchang, South Korea, Tuesday, Feb. 20, 2018. THE CANADIAN PRESS/AP-Charlie Riedel
Olympic champions Virtue, Moir and Tewksbury among 114 Order of Canada inductees

Moir and Virtue catapulted to national stardom with their gold-medal performances at the Winter Olympics in 2018

Shoppers line up in front of a shop on Montreal’s Saint-Catherine Street in search of Black Friday deals in Montreal, Friday, Nov. 27, 2020. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Paul Chiasson
Black Friday shopping in a pandemic: COVID-19 closes some stores, sales move online

Eric Morris, head of retail at Google Canada, says e-commerce in Canada has doubled during the pandemic.

Chilliwack school board trustee Barry Neufeld is taking heat over using a ableist slur to refer to three Black Press employees. (Paul Henderson/ Progress file)
BC School Trustees Association president keeps heat on Chilliwack Trustee Barry Neufeld

In a news release, Stephanie Higginson called on voters to take careful note of Neufeld’s behaviour

Most Read