Teachers in Penticton

Teachers in Penticton

B.C. teachers return to picket lines

B.C. teachers return to picket lines, ramp up pressure on government

  • Aug. 25, 2014 11:00 a.m.

By Tamsyn Burgmann, The Canadian Press

VANCOUVER – The union representing British Columbia’s striking teachers plans to spend the final week before the scheduled start of classes increasing pressure on the provincial government by resurrecting picket lines, airing radio ads and staging rallies.

And while it remains unclear whether students will be returning to their classrooms next Tuesday, principals and other support staff such as janitors were preparing for schools to open in the event of a last-minute deal.

Teachers have been on a full-scale strike since June, though the summer has been mostly devoid of formal negotiations and the two sides have acknowledged they remain far apart.

B.C. Teachers’ Federation president Jim Iker used an annual teacher training conference in Kamloops over the weekend to call on the provincial government to enter into mediation immediately, while promising that teachers would be out in “full force” this week to pressure the Liberal government.

The teachers’ federation sent an email to its members that said union delegates had decided to “intensify the pressure and stay the course.”

Radio ads sponsored by the B.C. Federation of Labour are set to air starting Wednesday, the email said, while the organization is also planning several events leading up to a “mass rally” on Sept. 5 outside the premier’s cabinet office in Vancouver.

Other rallies were being planned on separate days next week outside Education Minister Peter Fassbender’s constituency office in Langley; outside Christy Clark’s office in Kelowna; and outside Labour Minister Shirley Bond’s office in Prince George. Protests were also planned across the province on Labour Day.

The email said “study sessions” would be organized if a deal is not reached by Sept. 5, and that teachers should watch for further updates.

Earlier this month, veteran mediator Vince Ready agreed to monitor the dispute between the union and the B.C. Public Schools Employers’ Association, which bargains on behalf of the provincial government. Ready said he would be prepared to enter into full mediation if doing so would be productive.

The union said no talks were currently scheduled.

The two sides had agreed not to speak publicly, but both Iker and Fassbender have been recently speaking to media.

On Monday, an emailed statement from the minister’s office said the employer is ready to start mediation as soon as Ready deems it will be “productive.” Fassbender also re-iterated that government has “no desire” to legislate an end to the dispute.

Iker did not respond to a request for interview.

B.C. School Trustees Association president Theresa Rezansoff said she’s hopeful that the teachers’ union and the employer will find common ground soon.

“There’s not a lot of time left,” Rezansoff said. “Schools will be able to open on Sept. 2 if a deal is reached.”

Steve Cardwell, the superintendent of the Vancouver School Board, posted an online message to parents explaining how the board would respond, whether a settlement is reached or not.

Cardwell’s letter said the district would wait until Friday to announce whether schools would open “to provide both parties with the maximum amount of time to reach a negotiated settlement.”

The letter said parents shouldn’t send students to school if teachers remain on strike and it urged them to make alternate child-care arrangements.

Even if a new contract is reached, the letter said the board was still anticipating some disruptions to instruction, as timetables for post-secondary students might need to be changed.

“Our intention is that we return as quickly and smoothly as possible to normal school operations,” states the letter.

The Liberal government has announced that if the teachers’ strike continues into the fall, it will give parents with children aged 12 and under $40 a day to cover the costs of child care or tutoring.

Several organizations were rejigging staff to provide additional care, including the YMCA and Boys and Girls Club.

Carolyn Tuckwell, president of the south coast Boys and Girls Club, said the organization would ensure their usual roster of 3,000 children would be covered.

“From our perspective, it’s a little bit of a moving target,” she said. “What drives us is knowing that the worst case scenario is kids are supervised.”

Tuckwell said the sentiment from parents was not emotional so much as just being practical, with a shared recognition “the issues are complex.”

The YMCA of Great Vancouver said it could provide nearly 1,200 day-camp spaces, but had accumulated full wait lists for all locations except two.

The province’s 40,000 teachers staged several weeks of rotating strikes before launching a full-scale strike two weeks before the end of the school year.

The main issues in the dispute have been wages and teaching conditions, such as class size and class composition.

The government has said teachers’ wage increases must be affordable and in line with agreements signed by other public-sector employees.

(The Canadian Press, CHNL, CFJC)

Just Posted

Harrison Hot Springs country singer Todd Richard poses for a photo with Mission firefighters. (Photo/Sarah Plawutski)
VIDEO: Harrison country artist Todd Richard plans for a busy, rockin’ summer

Richard and his band look to live shows as restrictions start to lift

The theme for this year’s Fraser Valley Regional Library Summer Reading Club is “Crack the Case” and Katie Burns, community librarian at the Chilliwack Library, is encouraging people of all ages to sign up. She is seen here at the Chilliwack Library on Friday, June 18, 2021. (Jenna Hauck/ Chilliwack Progress)
Crack the case, read, win prizes with FVRL Summer Reading Club

‘Immerse yourself in other worlds and have a bit of fun while you do it,’ says Chilliwack librarian

Cpl. Scott MacLeod and Police Service Dog Jago. Jago was killed in the line of duty on Thursday, June 17. (RCMP)
Abbotsford police, RCMP grieve 4-year-old service dog killed in line of duty

Jago killed by armed suspect during ‘high-risk’ incident in Alberta

Holger Schwichtenberg and his son Philip talk in the barn of the 150-acre Schwichtenberg farm. This farm is one of many throughout B.C. that support more than 12,500 jobs across the province in the dairy industry. (Contributed Photo/B.C. Dairy Association)
Agassiz dairy farm a model of care for environment, animals, and family

Farm is part of a dairy sector centred in the Fraser Valley, supporting 12,500 jobs province-wide

Marco Mendicino, Minister of Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship during a press conference in Ottawa on Thursday, May 13, 2021. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Sean Kilpatrick
Canada to welcome 45,000 refugees this year, says immigration minister

Canada plans to increase persons admitted from 23,500 to 45,000 and expedite permanent residency applications

FILE – Most lanes remain closed at the Peace Arch border crossing into the U.S. from Canada, where the shared border has been closed for nonessential travel in an effort to prevent the spread of the coronavirus, Thursday, May 7, 2020, in Blaine, Wash. The restrictions at the border took effect March 21, while allowing trade and other travel deemed essential to continue. (AP Photo/Elaine Thompson)
Feds to issue update on border measures for fully vaccinated Canadians, permanent residents

Border with U.S. to remain closed to most until at least July 21

A portion of the George Road wildfire burns near Lytton, B.C. in this Friday, June 18, 2021 handout photo. THE CANADIAN PRESS/HO, BC Wildfire Service *MANDATORY CREDIT*
Blaze near Lytton spread across steep terrain, says BC Wildfire Service

Fire began Wednesday and is suspected to be human-caused, but remains under investigation

(Black Press Media files)
Burnaby RCMP look for witnesses in hit-and-run that left motorcyclist dead

Investigators believe that the suspect vehicle rear-ended the motorcycle before fleeing the scene

Join Black Press Media and Do Some Good
Join Black Press Media and Do Some Good

Pay it Forward program supports local businesses in their community giving

Cannabis bought in British Columbia (Ashley Wadhwani/Black Press Media)
Is it time to start thinking about greener ways to package cannabis?

Packaging suppliers are still figuring eco-friendly and affordable packaging options that fit the mandates of Cannabis Regulations

Blair Lebsack, owner of RGE RD restaurant, poses for a portrait in the dining room, in Edmonton, Friday, June 18, 2021. Canadian restaurants are having to find ways to deal with the rising cost of food. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jason Franson
Canadian restaurateurs grapple with rising food costs, menu prices expected to rise

Restaurants are a low margin industry, so there’s not a lot of room to work in additional costs

RCMP crest. (Black Press Media files)
Fort St. John man arrested after allegedly inviting sexual touching from children

Two children reported the incident to a trusted adult right away

Most Read