Toddlers Arianna

Centralized service coming for Seabird children

Seabird Island is clearing the way for a new centre that will provide a variety of services for Seabird’s youngest residents under one roof.

Seabird Island is clearing the way for a new Centre of Excellence. The centre will provide a variety of services for Seabird’s youngest residents under one roof.

Seabird Island offers a number of early childhood services. There’s an Aboriginal Infant Development program, for newborns up until about age 3. There’s supported childcare for children primarily aged 3-6. There’s a Speech and language program for young Aboriginal children. There’s Headstart, a drop-in program for children aged 0-6.

Right now all these programs are spread across four different buildings. Kids can start their morning in daycare, then have to put on their coats and boots again to go to preschool, then again get dressed for outside weather when they return to daycare for the rest of the afternoon. And parents can be found taking their children to appointments at a number of different locations.

Carolyne Neufeld is the health director at Seabird Island. She explains that the Centre of Excellence will provide ease of access for parents and a seamless transition for kids going from, say, daycare to preschool. With the new centre, those same kids can simply walk down the hall.

“The flow will be so much better,” Neufeld reports.

Chief Clem Seymour says the plans for this project have been discussed for maybe four or five years.

“It was always a dream of some people to make it happen,” says Seymour. “We want it all centralized.”

The site for the expanded facility is the old day school, next door to the current daycare. Seymour says he certainly won’t miss the old school, which he attended from grades 1 through 4 before moving to Silver Creek.

“It was different. It was kind of a culture shock,” he recalls.

He hasn’t heard reaction from residents about the building coming down. He says maybe for some the place was scarring, maybe for others it wasn’t. But, he says, “We always remember where we come from so we know where to go.”

Demolition is set to begin Feb. 28. The project is expected to take about a year before a grand opening some time in early 2016.

Just Posted

Wildfire update: Fires burning in Fraser Canyon, Highway 7 and Skagit Valley

Several fires in the region are under ‘modified response’ meaning no firefighters are attending

B.C. declares state of emergency as more than 560 wildfires rage

This is only the fourth state of emergency ever issued during a fire season

Chilliwack is home to Sasquatch, the first Canadian-designed hops plant

Created by Hops Connect, the Sasquatch hop is the country’s first patented hops plant

Highway 7 down to one-lane alternating as crews fight Mt. Hicks wildfire

150-hectare blaze prompted closure of a provincial park

Interim GoFundMe payments approved in Humboldt Broncos crash

$50,000 to be given to each of the 13 survivors and each family of the 16 people who died

Altidore nets 3 as Toronto drubs Whitecaps 5-2

Vancouver falls 7-4 on aggregate in Canadian Championship final

Ottawa intervenes to get B.C. ball player, 13, to Little League World Series

Before immigration issue was resolved, Dio Gama was out practicing the game he loves Wednesday

Pet goldfish invades small B.C. lake

Pinecrest Lake is located between Whistler and Squamish

Metro Vancouver water reservoirs in ‘good shape’

Reserves sitting at 70-per-cent full, officials said, despite long stretch without major rain

Mounties deployed to help B.C. communities affected by wildfires

RCMP officers heading to places particularly within central, northern and southern B.C.

Chinese medicine practitioner in B.C. facing historical sex assault charges

71-year old Kit Wong practiced acupuncture from his home during the time of the assaults

Quebec sets aside $900 million for companies hurt by U.S. tariffs

Premier Philippe Couillard says his government will make $863 million available over five years

Most Read