Gladys and Ed Scherbey, pictured here in 2013 in their home, complained for years about the RCMP investigation into their son Corey’s 2011 death insisting he was murdered. A BC Coroner’s jury concluded on Nov. 5, 2020 that his death was accidental due to cocaine and alcohol toxicity. (Paul Henderson/ Black Press file)

Gladys and Ed Scherbey, pictured here in 2013 in their home, complained for years about the RCMP investigation into their son Corey’s 2011 death insisting he was murdered. A BC Coroner’s jury concluded on Nov. 5, 2020 that his death was accidental due to cocaine and alcohol toxicity. (Paul Henderson/ Black Press file)

Coroner’s inquest rules Fraser Valley man’s mysterious death ‘accidental’

Parents of Corey John Scherbey have claimed he was murdered for nine years

Corey John Scherbey’s 2011 death in Chilliwack has been ruled “accidental” due to cocaine and alcohol intoxication.

That conclusion after a BC Coroners Service inquest this week confirms the original report but will be a disappointment to Scherbey’s parents Ed and Gladys Scherbey who have been fighting for more than nine years to have his death declared a homicide.

“I think it’s murder and that’s it,” Ed told this reporter in 2013 in an interview at his home, surrounded by photos of the Corey while he was alive, but also gruesome photos of the scene in the 38-year-old’s house where his body was found on a Monday after a hot August weekend.

• READ MORE: Coroner’s inquest into mysterious death of Chilliwack man scheduled for Nov. 2

• READ MORE: OPINION: Homicide or overdose? The curious case of Corey Scherbey continues

The inquest started Monday (Nov. 2) with the jury decision rendered on Thursday (Nov. 5). Corey Scherbey’s mother Gladys Scherbey testified Monday at the Burnaby Coroners’ Court in a hearing that was broadcast using Microsoft Teams.

She first told the jury what kind of a person Corey was.

“He was loving, he was gentle, he was a super person,” she said. “I’m not saying this because he was just my son but he was my best friend as well.”

She was then asked about the details of her finding Corey’s body in his house on Aug. 22, 2011.

He wasn’t answering his phone or his doorbell, so Gladys went into his Strathcona Road house. There in his living room was a huge pool of dried blood on the floor, and Corey on his knees in front of the couch, face down.

“My heart sank,” she said on Monday. “I said ‘Corey, Corey, are you alright? Answer me, answer me Corey.’”

She said she went behind him, and her instinct was to put her arms around him to lift him up.

“All I could see was the back of his head. His hands were stretched out…. I pulled him against my chest and gently laid him down. When I laid him down, I looked … his face was dark. I saw no hair on the top of his head… his nose was white. I looked on both sides of his head. His right ear seemed to be missing, his left ear was completely flat.”

Gladys and Ed have been fighting for years against the RCMP’s conclusion that 38-year-old Corey died of a drug overdose.

A pathologist at the time determined the cause of death to be “acute combined cocaine and ethanol intoxication,” something the coroner confirmed Nov. 5.

The Scherbey’s insisted that Corey did not use drugs or even drink, and they pointed to a number of odd circumstances surrounding the crime scene, and events after his death.

There was the cardboard box found in his house with the words written on it: “Better be a funeral.”

Then there was a cryptic, typewritten note they received years after his death.

“Shakepeare [sic] said: ‘Hell hath no fury than a woman scorned,’” the note started. “That’s the kind of homicide is [sic] was, a scorned woman! Those who know who it was, belong to too tight a group to say a word!

“I think your son Corey decided too late to ‘back off’ and it jeopardized his well-being-his life!” The note was signed “a Reader of The CHWK Times.”

• READ MORE: Cryptic note may hold clue to Scherbey death

While the RCMP never admitted any wrongdoing, the Scherbeys accused it all along. Finally, in late 2018, RCMP Commissioner Brenda Lucki agreed the investigation was not “reasonably thorough.”

That same year, one B.C. Supreme Court justice called for a review, and another suggested the Minister of Public Safety should consider an inquest.

The pandemic delayed the inquest from the spring until Nov. 2.

In the two-page verdict posted online on Nov. 5, the medical cause of death is reported as “acute combined ethanol and cocaine intoxication,” and the classification of death is ruled “accidental.”

The inquest jury’s single recommendations to RCMP headquarters (E-division) in B.C.: “Review policy or procedures to ensure the collection of all possible evidence in death investigations.”

• READ MORE: Chilliwack parents can’t accept police findings in death of son


Do you have something to add to this story, or something else we should report on? Email:
paul.henderson@theprogress.com

@PeeJayAitch
Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

CoronavirusInquest

Just Posted

Brandon Hobbs (turquoise shirt), brother of missing Abbotsford man Adam Hobbs, gathers with other family and friends to distribute posters in Chilliwack on Thursday, June 17, 2021. (Jenna Hauck/ Chilliwack Progress)
Search efforts expand to Chilliwack and beyond for missing Abbotsford man

Family, friends put up posters in Chilliwack, Agassiz, Hope for missing 22-year-old Adam Hobbs

A CH-149 Cormorant from 442 Transport and Rescue Squadron out of CFB Comox on a training exercise in Chilliwack on June 16, 2021. (William Snow photo)
VIDEO: Military search and rescue training in Chilliwack Wednesday

CH-149 Cormorant and CC-115 Buffalo from CFB Comox participated in downed aircraft rescue simulation

Stock photo by LEEROY Agency from Pixabay
Drop-in vaccination clinics slated in Abbotsford for construction workers

Among three sites in Lower Mainland holding no-appointment clinics in June and July

In this pre-pandemic meeting at the Friendship House in Agassiz, a packed house of residents expressed their concerns for and against the Teacup properties exclusion application to the ALC. The ALC recently denied the exclusion, keeping the McDonald Road properties as agricultural land. (File Photo/Adam Louis)
ALC refuses Teacup properties exclusion application

The decision comes nearly one year after application submitted

People line up to get their COVID-19 vaccine at a vaccination centre, Thursday, June 10, 2021 in Montreal. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Ryan Remiorz
Vaccines, low COVID case counts increase Father’s Day hope, but risk is still there

Expert says people will have to do their own risk calculus before popping in on Papa

Helen Austin performing with Trent Freeman at the 2018 Vancouver Island MusicFest. Austin is one of the many performers listed for the 2021 event.
Vancouver Island MusicFest goes virtual for 2021

Black Press to stream 25 hours of programming July 9-11

FILE – A science class at L.A. Matheson Secondary in Surrey, B.C. on March 12, 2021. (Lauren Collins/Surrey Now Leader)
Teachers’ union wants more COVID transmission data as B.C. prepares for back-to-school

BCTF says that details will be important as province works on plan for September

Provincial health officer Dr. Bonnie Henry outlines B.C.’s COVID-19 restart plan, May 25, 2021, including larger gatherings and a possible easing of mandatory masks on July 1. (B.C. government photo)
B.C. records 120 new COVID-19 cases, second vaccines accelerating

Lower Pfizer deliveries for early July, Moderna shipments up

Join Black Press Media and Do Some Good
Join Black Press Media and Do Some Good

Pay it Forward program supports local businesses in their community giving

Cannabis bought in British Columbia (Ashley Wadhwani/Black Press Media)
Is it time to start thinking about greener ways to package cannabis?

Packaging suppliers are still figuring eco-friendly and affordable packaging options that fit the mandates of Cannabis Regulations

A Heffley Creek peacock caught not one - but two - lifts on a logging truck this month. (Photo submitted)
Heffley Creek-area peacock hops logging trucks in search of love

Peacock hitched two lifts in the past month

The Calgary skyline is seen on Friday, Sept. 15, 2017. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jeff McIntosh
2 deaths from COVID-19 Delta variant in Alberta, 1 patient was fully immunized

Kerry Williamson with Alberta Health Services says the patients likely acquired the virus in the hospital

The first suspension bridge is the tallest in Canada, with a second suspension bridge just below it. The two are connected by a trail that’s just over 1 km. (Claire Palmer photo)
PHOTOS: The highest suspension bridges in Canada just opened in B.C.

The Skybridge in Golden allows visitors to take in views standing at 130 and 80 metres

Most Read