Pictured from left: firefighters Andy Michaluk and Cris Vandendries, fire captain Bruce Holbrook and firefighter Debra Rogers. Photo courtesy Campbell River Fire Rescue

Day of Mourning to be held virtually

Tomorrow, April 28, marks the National Day of Mourning which will not publicly take place

April 28, marks the National Day of Mourning.

However, due to the COVID-19 pandemic the event, which usually takes place in community parks, will be held virtually.

The event is a day to mourn workers killed, injured or made ill by their job that has taken place on April 28 since 1991.

In 1984, unions in Sudbury, Ontario, adopted the day to publicly acknowledge workplace injuries, illnesses, and deaths, then in 1991, Canada recognized its first National Day of Mourning.

Instead of gathering together in public, Work Safe BC is asking residents across the province to take a moment of silence, at 10:30 a.m., to remember the 140 B.C. workers who died last year from a workplace injury or disease.

Some other ways to commemorate the day include:

  • Sending a message to staff re-enforcing your commitment to a healthy and safe workplace and sharing the link to the commemorative video
  • Observing a moment of silence on April 28
  • Sharing a message on social media
  • Ordering a wreath for your office or worksite

UFCW Canada along with others in the international labour movement, is calling on employers to protect the front line and #StopThePandemicAtWork by ensuring that workers are protected on the job, by instituting appropriate physical distancing measures at work, and by providing premium pay to employees who have to work through the COVID-19 pandemic.

Support the day of action by using the hashtags #StopThePandemicAtWork and #DayOfMourning.

READ MORE: ‘We are working the front lines’: Behind the till with a B.C. grocery store employee

READ MORE: Crisis lines face volunteer, cash crunch even as COVID-19 drives surge in calls

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