Since January 2019, the Delta Police Department has been training and equipping officers with a 40-mm foam projectile launcher. The launcher will provide officers with an intermediate less-lethal use-of-force option when responding to high-risk calls. (Delta Police Department photo)

Delta police roll out less-lethal foam projectile launcher

Launcher provides officers with an intermediate use-of-force option on high-risk calls

Delta police are letting the public know about a new tool officers have to safely resolve high-risk situations.

Since January of this year, the Delta Police Department has been training and equipping officers with a 40-mm foam projectile launcher, also called an impact weapon. The launchers will provide officers with an intermediate less-lethal use-of-force option when responding to high-risk calls.

“The key thing about this equipment is that it allows our officers to maintain or create distance, buy time and build options toward a safe resolution when immediate action isn’t required,” DPD Deputy Chief Norm Lipinski said in a press release. “It’s not likely that the public will often see our officers carrying or using these weapons, as they are intended for use in high risk situations. However, we wanted to be open about this change in our equipment as the weapon is very distinctive looking, with a bright green barrel.”

The launcher is replacing what are commonly known as bean bag guns as it offers advantages such as advanced optics and better accuracy. The projectile has a plastic body with a foam or sponge nose and is spin-stabilized, giving it a higher degree of accuracy over distance. The most common injury a person would receive from this weapon is bruising, swelling and physical discomfort.

“The trend in law enforcement across North America is to move to progressive weapon options such as this. In a high-risk situation officers may be able to keep an appropriate distance from a person, which should give more opportunity to safely talk and de-escalate the situation if possible,” Lipinski said.

Lipinski stressed that the addition of the launcher will not alter the department’s emphasis on the importance of communication first, whenever possible in a given situation.

The press release notes DPD officers receive comprehensive de-escalation training and, when possible, will first speak or otherwise communicate with a person and determine how to best keep everyone safe.

Since roll out of the launcher began in January, it has only been used once, though not on a person.

The DPD is moving to equip and train all front-line officers working in sections such as patrol and traffic.



editor@northdeltareporter.com

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Comments are closed

Just Posted

Emergency crews respond to ATV rollover near Harrison

ATV rolled over on or near Harrison East Forest Service Road near Harrison Hot Springs

Guilty verdict for one of two men in large illegal marijuana grow-operation in Chilliwack

Charges dismissed against property owner where 3,200 plants, 32 kgs of dried weed found in 2017

Cubs rescued, hunter fined after sow shot in Skagit Valley

Officers opt for fines, as hefty punishment could prevent hunter cooperation in future

95-site RV camping to be built in Manning Park

RV park one of first to be built in a provincial park

Search continues for person seen floating in Coquihalla River in Hope

Rescuers halted the search Thursday night as darkness fell

VIDEO: Musqueam Chief captures captivating footage of bald eagle catching meal

‘This is why we have chosen to live here since time immemorial,’ Chief Wayne Sparrow’s nephew says

Police ramp up efforts to get impaired drivers off B.C. roads this summer

July is dedicated to the Summer CounterAttack Impaired Driving Campaign

Migrant workers stage multi-city action for full status amid COVID-19 risks

‘COVID-19 has exacerbated an existing crisis’

Okanagan school drops ‘Rebels’ sports team name, citing links with U.S. Civil War

Name and formerly-used images “fly in the face” of the district’s human rights policy, says board chair

PHOTOS: B.C.’s top doc picks up personalized Fluevog shoes, tours mural exhibition

Murals of Gratitude exhibit includes at least one portrait of Henry alongside paintings of health-care workers

Langley vigil demands justice for Ontario animal activist killed protesting in front of slaughterhouse

More than two dozen people gathered at Britco Pork to remember Regan Russell, and fight Bill 156

In troubled times: Independence Day in a land of confusion

Buffeted by invisible forces and just plain worn out, the United States of America celebrates its 244th birthday

Stop enforcing sex work laws during COVID-19, advocates say

There are provisions in Canada’s prostitution laws that make workers immune from prosecution, but not from arrest

Liberal party finished 2019 having spent $43 million, raised $42 million

All political parties had until midnight June 30 to submit their financial reports for last year

Most Read