Andre Isakov explains the changes to the zoning bylaw at a recent open house. The changes will be reviewed by council at an upcoming meeting.

Draft bylaw spells out rules for suites in Harrison

Public hearing next step for outdated zoning bylaw

An outdated zoning bylaw in Harrison Hot Springs is nearing the end of a review process, and a small group of residents attended an open house last Thursday explaining the proposed changes.

Andre Isakov, manager of planning and community services for the Village, led a presentation outlining the draft bylaw, which was reworked with the help of the Area Planning Commission. Much of it includes administration changes that more clearly set out the definitions of different zones. Other highlights of the draft bylaw are a new residential zone, clear secondary suites regulations and better wording.

The new housing density zone, R-1A, refers to a low density residential, medium lot.

The proposed zoning bylaw clearly defines the permitted uses for each zone using “easier-to-understand” graphs, listing the principal and accessory uses appropriate for each density zone.

Accessory secondary suites would be allowed in the proposed zoning bylaw, in low density zones R-1 through R-4. However, Isakov pointed out that it is stated in the draft that the owner of a home must live in either the suite or the main living area of the house — meaning that entire houses could not be suited out to different renters.

Last Thursday’s meeting, held in Memorial Hall, was the first of two public open houses. The second was held this Thursday, after press time. The process of updating the bylaw was started by former Village planner Michael Rosen. It has already been under legal review and council review.

The Village is still open to public feedback, and the draft bylaw will be the subject of a public hearing on November 19.

If council approves the draft bylaw, it will then go through adoption.

At an October 15 council meeting, councillor Allan Jackson said he was “opposed to secondary suites” citing concerns of how Harrison would look if too many houses are suited out.

“I have enough experience to see what happens when all of a sudden you change a residential area into a multi-family area,” he said. “Housing in Harrison is already inexpensive as it is.”

While he supports families having an in-law suite, he said he’s worried about the future look of Harrison.

“It’s a slippery slope,” he said. Councillor John Buckley said he agreed with Jackson’s statements.

Jackson opposed the first and second reading of the new bylaw.

Last Thursday, Isakov walked the audience through the reasons behind a zoning bylaw, and the differences between the bylaw and the Official Community Plan.

A zoning bylaw implements the objectives and policies of the OCP, provides a legal way of managing land use and future development, and protects the community from conflicting and possibly dangerous land uses.

The OCP sets out general policy for future land use, and the zoning bylaw puts that plan into effect, he said. The current bylaw is about 16 years old. Isakov said they should be updated every five to 10 years.


Just Posted

Craft beer hop farm on Seabird territory preparing for first harvest

Founders have plans to become one of Canada’s largest hops suppliers

Lower Mainland could see spring flurries

Snow expected at higher elevations

Experts detect risk of rock avalanche above Bridal Falls near Chilliwack

Risk in the one-in-10,000-year is minimal but triggers FVRD to direct growth elsewhere

Auditors couldn’t tell if Fraser Health executives bought booze on taxpayers’ dime

Review from 2014 says one administrator bought Bose headphones on company credit card

Vancouver Aquarium’s resident octopus released into ocean

Staff let the Giant Pacific octopus go into the waters near Bowen Island so she can reproduce

5 to start your day

A woman takes issue with students’ attempt at a joke, a suspicious package at a tax centre, and more

Fat joke on B.C. school’s sign not appropriate, woman says

Surrey mother says weight issues are no laughing matter

Missing Vancouver man may be in Vernon area

Brent Galster, 62, last seen at a Vernon ATM in December

McMaster out, Bolton in as Trump’s national security adviser

President Donald is replacing National security adviser H.R. McMaster with John Bolton

Two killed, dozen hurt in French supermarket hostage-taking

French counterterrorism prosecutors are taking charge of the investigation into the shooting of a police officer in southern France

Canadian women move to No. 4 in FIFA world rankings

Canadian women match all-time high, move back to No. 4 in FIFA world rankings

Supreme Court rules former Stephen Harper aide guilty of influence peddling

A one-time senior aide to former prime minister Stephen Harper has been found guilty of influence peddling by Canada’s highest court.

Annual inflation rate rises to 2.2% for its fastest pace since fall 2014

Statistics Canada says the consumer price index in February was up 2.2 per cent compared with a year ago

Most Read