Andre Isakov explains the changes to the zoning bylaw at a recent open house. The changes will be reviewed by council at an upcoming meeting.

Draft bylaw spells out rules for suites in Harrison

Public hearing next step for outdated zoning bylaw

An outdated zoning bylaw in Harrison Hot Springs is nearing the end of a review process, and a small group of residents attended an open house last Thursday explaining the proposed changes.

Andre Isakov, manager of planning and community services for the Village, led a presentation outlining the draft bylaw, which was reworked with the help of the Area Planning Commission. Much of it includes administration changes that more clearly set out the definitions of different zones. Other highlights of the draft bylaw are a new residential zone, clear secondary suites regulations and better wording.

The new housing density zone, R-1A, refers to a low density residential, medium lot.

The proposed zoning bylaw clearly defines the permitted uses for each zone using “easier-to-understand” graphs, listing the principal and accessory uses appropriate for each density zone.

Accessory secondary suites would be allowed in the proposed zoning bylaw, in low density zones R-1 through R-4. However, Isakov pointed out that it is stated in the draft that the owner of a home must live in either the suite or the main living area of the house — meaning that entire houses could not be suited out to different renters.

Last Thursday’s meeting, held in Memorial Hall, was the first of two public open houses. The second was held this Thursday, after press time. The process of updating the bylaw was started by former Village planner Michael Rosen. It has already been under legal review and council review.

The Village is still open to public feedback, and the draft bylaw will be the subject of a public hearing on November 19.

If council approves the draft bylaw, it will then go through adoption.

At an October 15 council meeting, councillor Allan Jackson said he was “opposed to secondary suites” citing concerns of how Harrison would look if too many houses are suited out.

“I have enough experience to see what happens when all of a sudden you change a residential area into a multi-family area,” he said. “Housing in Harrison is already inexpensive as it is.”

While he supports families having an in-law suite, he said he’s worried about the future look of Harrison.

“It’s a slippery slope,” he said. Councillor John Buckley said he agreed with Jackson’s statements.

Jackson opposed the first and second reading of the new bylaw.

Last Thursday, Isakov walked the audience through the reasons behind a zoning bylaw, and the differences between the bylaw and the Official Community Plan.

A zoning bylaw implements the objectives and policies of the OCP, provides a legal way of managing land use and future development, and protects the community from conflicting and possibly dangerous land uses.

The OCP sets out general policy for future land use, and the zoning bylaw puts that plan into effect, he said. The current bylaw is about 16 years old. Isakov said they should be updated every five to 10 years.

 

news@ahobserver.com

 

Just Posted

District of Kent to implement snow fence pilot project

$8,000 project to help prevent hazardous, drifting snow, and more from Kent council

PHOTOS: Fraser Valley Eagle Festival

Mission photographer Bob Friesen shares some of his images with the Record

PHOTOS: Harrison warms up to Christmas

The Lions Club hosts holiday event for community

11 years sought for Burnaby man who killed girlfriend with hammer, burned her body

Manslaughter sentencing hearing starts Monday in BC Supreme Court in Chilliwack for Ryan Armstrong

German-born British Columbian warns against a ‘yes’ vote on proportional representation

Agassiz realtor Freddy Marks says PR in his home country shows party elites can never be voted out

Police aim to prevent retaliation after Hells Angel found dead under B.C. bridge

IHIT confirms Chad Wilson, 43, was the victim of a ‘targeted’ homicide

Canucks’ 50/50 jackpot expected to surpass $1 million

The guaranteed prize for one lucky winner will be $500,000 minimum when Vancouver hosts LA Nov 27

The latest advent calendar trend: Holiday cannabis

A Canadian company is giving people from coast to coast a new way to celebrate the Christmas countdown.

B.C. woman allegedly threatens to rip out intestines of American man

A Kamloops-area woman is accused of harassing and threatening to disembowel an American man

B.C. model looks a lot like expanded taxi industry, ride-hailing group says

Ridesharing Now for BC says it had hoped the bill would be more customer-driven like in other cities

Otter makes a snack out of koi fish in Vancouver Chinese garden

Staff say the otter has eaten at least five fish

731,000 Canadians going into debt to buy prescription drugs: UBC

Millennials and those without private coverage were more likely to borrow money

Pot users, investors need to be vigilant at Canada-U.S. border

U.S. authorities say anyone who admits to having used pot before it became legal could be barred

Shirtless stranger loomed over couch and started stabbing, bloody B.C. murder trial hears

Colin John pleads not guilty as trial opens in 2016 Chemainus murder case

Most Read