Metro looks to level field for incinerator alternatives

Board votes to send waste-to-energy procurement strategy back for rethink

Port Moody Mayor Mike Clay speaks in debate on waste-to-energy procurement at Metro Vancouver's Sept. 21 board meeting.

Port Moody Mayor Mike Clay speaks in debate on waste-to-energy procurement at Metro Vancouver's Sept. 21 board meeting.

Metro Vancouver directors who oppose building a new garbage incinerator have persuaded the board to rethink its planned procurement rules, arguing they could thwart new greener waste-to-energy technologies.

Metro directors were poised to approve the procurement strategy Friday but instead voted to send it back to staff and the zero waste committee to refine the regional district’s approach to developing a new waste-fired plant.

Vancouver Coun. Andrea Reimer said emerging waste-to-energy technologies that might be much less polluting than a conventional incinerator could be blocked because of a planned requirement that proponents have operating plants where they can prove their system works.

That gives incineration, with its long history, too much of an advantage over rapidly evolving alternatives that might still be at a small demonstration stage but on the cusp of being commercially viable, she said.

“We have been burning garbage in large piles since we figured out how to do fire,” Reimer said. “It’s been happening for 50,000 years.”

Port Moody Mayor Mike Clay said he’s also concerned the proven track record requirement will block emerging operators in the first phase of Metro’s planned multi-stage bidding process.

The region intends to first identify viable technologies and proponents, then potential sites in and outside the region, before winnowing the potential P3 partners to a short list of three who would compete in a final bidding phase.

“All of this leads down the path of probably one large mass-burn incineration facility serving the region,” Clay warned.

Surrey Coun. Marvin Hunt supported Reimer’s call to widen the scope for alternate technologies, which is to be considered further in committee, adding fairness is critically important.

Richmond Coun. Harold Steves also supported the change, saying Metro is otherwise on track to build a “fossil fuel power plant” that will burn plastic and increase particulate and greenhouse gas emissions.

Metro staff say the procurement of an extra 370,000 tonnes of waste-to-energy capacity is already highly complex and subject to a provincial directive that all sites and technologies compete fairly.

They say the aim is to ensure proponents can demonstrate their ability to perform, and loosening that rule would add more risk to an already challenging process, since the board won’t make a final decision on what will be built where until 2015. The plant or plants wouldn’t open until late 2018, after extensive consultations and environmental assessment.

“If we try to incorporate the vagaries of a promising technology, it’s going to make it a lot more complicated,” Metro chief financial officer Jim Rusnak said.

Addressing concern the plan required proponents have a “full-scale reference facility” on which they would be judged, Metro managers say it need not be a large plant, but perhaps one with a minimum size of 30,000 to 50,000 tonnes per year.

Burnaby Coun. Colleen Jordan said she’s worried more delay in the process – because some politicians hope a “magical” and more palatable WTE technology will pop up – might result in rejected bidders going to court to challenge Metro’s eventual decision.

“People outside this room are looking at this process too,” she said.

Reimer said she is reluctant to re-fight the issue in committee and cause further delay, noting the Metro board is fundamentally split on technology, with some directors comfortable with incineration and Vancouver council among others staunchly opposed.

Also to be reconsidered is whether an earlier decision to require any new plant is “publicly owned” be tightened to just Metro Vancouver-owned.

Some directors say the looser public ownership term – which Hunt wanted so local cities could be co-owners – may lead private firms to start talks with cities, other levels of governments or even Crown corporations, adding more chaos to the process.

“You could have the port, you could have the universities, the airport authority, the health authorities,” Richmond Mayor Malcolm Brodie said. “You’re potentially opening it up very widely.”

He noted that even if Metro is the only permitted owner, other entities like the port or airport could still offer to host the new plant when the region asks interested land owners to step forward next year.

Google+

Just Posted

(Adam Louis/Observer)
PHOTOS: Students leap into action in track events at Kent Elementary

At Kent Elementary, when the sun’s outside, the fun’s outside. The intermediate… Continue reading

Kindergarten kids from Evans elementary school in Chilliwack painted rocks with orange hearts and delivered them to Sto:lo Elders Lodge recently after learning about residential schools. (Laura Bridge photo)
Kindergarten class paints rocks with orange hearts in Chilliwack for local elders

‘Compassion and empathy’ being shown by kids learning about residential schools

Chilliwack potter Cathy Terepocki (left) and Indigenous enhancement teachers Val Tosoff (striped top) and Christine Seymour (fuchsia coat), along with students at Vedder middle school, look at some of the 500-plus pinch pots on Thursday, June 10 made by the kids to honour the 215 children found at Kamloops Indian Residential School. (Jenna Hauck/ Chilliwack Progress)
Chilliwack students make hundreds of tiny clay pots in honour of 215 Indigenous children

‘I think the healing process has begun,’ says teacher about Vedder middle school project

Image by Free-Photos from Pixabay
Webinar looks at sexual abuse prevention among adolescents

Vancouver/Fraser Valley CoSA hosts free online session on June 15

One person was transported to hospital with minor injuries following a two-vehicle crash on Hot Springs Road June 10. (Adam Louis/Observer)
One hurt following two-vehicle crash on Hot Springs Road

Agassiz Fire Department, B.C. Ambulance Service attended with RCMP

At an outdoor drive-in convocation ceremony, Mount Royal University bestows an honorary Doctor of Laws on Blackfoot Elder and residential school survivor Clarence Wolfleg in Calgary on Tuesday, June 8, 2021. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jeff McIntosh
‘You didn’t get the best of me’: Residential school survivor gets honorary doctorate

Clarence Wolfleg receives honorary doctorate from Mount Royal University, the highest honour the school gives out

Two-year-old Ivy McLeod laughs while playing with Lucky the puppy outside their Chilliwack home on Thursday, June 10, 2021. (Jenna Hauck/ Chilliwack Progress)
VIDEO: B.C. family finds ‘perfect’ puppy with limb difference for 2-year-old Ivy

Ivy has special bond with Lucky the puppy who was also born with limb difference

A million-dollar ticket was sold to an individual in Vernon from the Lotto Max draw Friday, June 11, 2021. (Photo courtesy of BCLC)
Lottery ticket worth $1 million sold in Vernon

One lucky individual holds one of 20 tickets worth $1 million from Friday’s Lotto Max draw

Join Black Press Media and Do Some Good
Join Black Press Media and Do Some Good

Pay it Forward program supports local businesses in their community giving

Cannabis bought in British Columbia (Ashley Wadhwani/Black Press Media)
Is it time to start thinking about greener ways to package cannabis?

Packaging suppliers are still figuring eco-friendly and affordable packaging options that fit the mandates of Cannabis Regulations

“65 years, I’ve carried the stories in my mind and live it every day,” says Jack Kruger. (Athena Bonneau)
‘Maybe this time they will listen’: Survivor shares stories from B.C. residential school

Jack Kruger, living in Syilx territory, wasn’t surprised by news of 215 children’s remains found on the grounds of the former Kamloops Indian Residential School

A logging truck carries its load down the Elaho Valley near in Squamish, B.C. in this file photo. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Chuck Stoody
Squamish Nation calls for old-growth logging moratorium in its territory

The nation says 44% of old-growth forests in its 6,900-square kilometre territory are protected while the rest remain at risk

Flowers and cards are left at a makeshift memorial at a monument outside the former Kamloops Indian Residential School to honour the 215 children whose remains are believed to have been discovered buried near the city in Kamloops, B.C., on Monday, May 31, 2021. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck
‘Pick a Sunday:’ Indigenous leaders ask Catholics to stay home, push for apology

Indigenous leaders are calling on Catholics to stand in solidarity with residential school survivors by not attending church services

Most Read