New Fraser Health poster campaign raises awareness of opioid overdoses

Stark posters warn of overdose dangers to be displayed at transit stops, bars and restaurants aimed at recreational drug users

SURREY, B.C. – Fraser Health has launched a poster ad campaign bolstering its ongoing drive to raise awareness of what it says is the overdose crisis in British Columbia.

The posters will be displayed at transit stops, bars and restaurants, and are aimed at recreational and regular drug users, their families and friends.

One message on the  stark, black and white posters says: “If you use drugs: Have a plan. Go slowly. Use with a buddy. Carry naloxone.”

The posters also offer instructions for anyone finding an overdose victim, directing them to call 911, start emergency breathing and use naloxone, which can reverse the effects of an opioid overdose.

Fraser Health says in a news release that it is confident about the effectiveness of the campaign because the posters were tested in focus groups of regular and recreational drug users.

In April, B.C.’s provincial health officer declared a public health emergency linked to the soaring number of opioid overdoses, and the declaration remains in effect.

Dr. Victoria Lee, Fraser Health’s chief medical health officer, says the poster campaign is an extension of the health authority’s ongoing public awareness campaign, but she says much more has been done to fight overdose deaths.

“We’ve created new substance-use beds to provide safe and supportive environments for people (who) require additional support on their road to recovery,” Lee says in the release.

Over the last 12 to 18 months, Fraser Health has opened 50 new substance-use beds, including a three-bed program for youth and a 12-bed facility for women who are pregnant or have newborns.

A further 97 beds are slated to open by 2017 across the region, which stretches from Burnaby, through Surrey to White Rock and east to Hope.

The announcement of the poster campaign and the update on available substance-use beds comes as Fraser Health prepares to mark International Overdose Awareness Day on Aug. 31.

The Canadian Press

Just Posted

Water upgrade work starts in Harrison

Participation compulsory for impacted properties

Trial date scheduled for man charged with killing Abbotsford officer

Oscar Arfmann slated to go to trial in New Westminster in January 2019

Union files human rights complaint over Chilliwack school trustee’s LGBTQ comments

Board and trustee Barry Neufeld facing $50,000 tribunal charge over alleged ‘unsafe work environment’

Trial begins for man charged with 2010 murder of Mandy Johnson

Langley single mom was fatally shot while in vehicle in Abbotsford

Men accused in Michael Bonin’s murder knew him: IHIT

20-year-old’s body found on a rural service road North of Hope in April

Find Your Fit tour comes to Agassiz

Gives students hands-on experience with career-planning tools

Vernon to host largest Special Olympics B.C. Winter Games in 2019

Games to be held Feb. 21-23, with more than 800 athletes expected to take part

Sentencing hearing begins for ex-BC Liberals employee in ‘quick wins’ scandal

Former communications director Brian Bonney pleaded guilty last October

Council tells TransLink commission to make sure road pricing is fair

Maple Ridge tells road pricing commission to make sure system is fair

Sunwing vacation passengers left at Abbotsford airport

YXX staffers receive praise for help to passengers; airline criticized

Ice dancers Virtue and Moir to carry flag for Canada at 2018 Olympics

The pair earned a gold medal at the 2010 Vancouver Olympic Games

5 to start your day

‘Young, innocent’ teen dies in Vancouver shootout, 152 Street overpass repairs start and more

Congestion points or distance: How Metro Vancouver could pay for its roads

Mobility pricing commission identifies two options in report

Most Read