(Unsplash)

(Unsplash)

No change for animal control in Harrison

Harrison will continue to see its animal control duties organized out of the FVRD

Harrison Hot Springs’ animal-related complaints will continue to be dealt with by the Fraser Valley Regional District (FVRD).

Back in the fall, council asked staff to bring back a report on Harrison’s animal control complaints, to see if there was enough reason to switch from the regional approach back to the village bylaw officer.

Harrison moved its animal control duties over to the FVRD in 2016, as did the District of Kent and Mission.

RELATED: Animal control moves to regional approach

As part of the agreement, Harrison pays the FVRD $4,400 a year, and the regional animal control team responds to Harrison complaints on an on-call basis. The $4,400 includes the money Harrison collects for dog licences and tax requisitions, and helps to cover basic facility infrastructure, plus the animal control officer’s time for call outs, although not for general patrol.

According to the staff report, which came forward during Monday night’s council meeting (Dec. 2), Harrison has seen a fairly stable number of animal complaints since 2016.

In 2017 and 2018, the village saw 10 aggressive dog investigations — up from six in 2016, but down to only two in 2019. (Statistics from 2019 included up to Nov. 13.)

The data also showed a fairly consistent number of barking complaint investigations (an average of six a year over the last four years) and pound intakes (between one and four each year).

In 2018, there was a significant increase in dog-at-large calls, however, this was due to two local owners who refused to leash their dogs.

“So, the numbers really haven’t risen all that much, in fact they’re lower this year,” community services coordinator Rhonda Schell said during council.

Although the village’s bylaw officer is not responsible for enforcing animal-related complaints, he does take an educational approach when interacting with owners who have animals at large.

The report was designed to give council some background data to decide whether it made sense to move back to having the village in charge of its own animal control.

The cost of having a dedicated animal control officer in the village would be approximately $25,000, based on 600 hours of patrol, largely in the summer months.

RELATED: Managing dogs in the village

Although council had been interested in moving towards in-house enforcement, the proposed cost for the service seemed prohibitive.

“To me, it feels at this point in time that there really isn’t a need to secure the position of a dedicated animal control officer,” councillor Michie Vidal said. “I couldn’t justify the cost of $25,000 to have a seasonal officer.”

Councillor Gerry Palmer agreed.

“Although I’m recognizing that what we have is not very strong, I’m also recognizing that having a dedicated animal control officer … would be pretty prohibitive for the village,” Palmer said. “I’m not totally sure if it’s going to have enough of an impact in just the summer.”

Council voted unanimously to stay with the FVRD.



grace.kennedy@ahobserver.com

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

A video posted to social media by Chilliwack resident Rob Iezzi shows a teenager getting kicked in the face after being approached by three suspects on Friday, Jan. 22, 2021. (YouTube/Rob i)
VIDEO: Security cameras capture ‘just one more assault’ near Chilliwack secondary

Third high-school related assault Rob Iezzi’s cameras have captured since beginning of 2021

Grace Kennedy Editorial Agassiz Harrison Observer image
EDITORIAL: With COVID-19, knowledge is power

Editor Grace Kennedy explains why the Observer is reporting on local case numbers, despite the flaws

Fraser Health issued an overdose alert on Jan. 21, 2021 after an increase in overdoses over the past week in Chilliwack associated with a “greeny-blue/turquoise down substance.” (Paul Henderson/ Chilliwack Progress file)
Fraser Health issues drug overdose alert in Chilliwack

Alert comes after increase in overdoses associated with ‘greeny-blue/turquoise down substance’

Chilliwack Chiefs forward Sasha Teleguine, seen here with Thayer Academy, is on the NHL’s Central Scouting Bureau updated watch list. (Twitter photo)
Chilliwack Chief Sasha Teleguine holds spot on Central Scouting Bureau’s watch list

Teleguine and Prince George forward Finlay Williams are viewed as potential late round NHL picks

Thursday, Jan. 28, 2021 is International Lego Day. (Jenna Hauck/ Chilliwack Progress)
Unofficial holidays: Here’s what people are celebrating for the week of Jan. 24 to 30

Lego Day, Talk Like a Grizzled Prospector Day and Puzzle Day are all coming up this week

Giants defenceman Bowen Byram has recorded his first NHL career point (Rob Wilton/special to Langley Advance Times)
VIDEO: Vancouver Giants Bowen Byram records first NHL career point with Colorado Avalanche

Player with Langley-based WHL franchise assisted on goal against the Ducks

Surrey Fire Service responded to a fire in the industrial area of 192nd street and 54th Avenue early Saturday morning (Jan. 23, 2021). (Photo: Shane MacKichan)
Surrey crews respond to fire in industrial area

Fire happened early Saturday morning

FILE - In this Feb. 14, 2017, file photo, Oklahoma State Rep. Justin Humphrey prepares to speak at the State Capitol in Oklahoma City. A mythical, ape-like creature that has captured the imagination of adventurers for decades has now become the target of Rep. Justin Humphrey. Humphrey, a Republican House member has introduced a bill that would create a Bigfoot hunting season, He says issuing a state hunting license and tag could help boost tourism. (Steve Gooch/The Oklahoman via AP, File)
Oklahoma lawmaker proposes ‘Bigfoot’ hunting season

A Republican House member has introduced a bill that would create a Bigfoot hunting season

Economic Development and Official Languages Minister Melanie Joly responds to a question in the House of Commons Monday November 23, 2020 in Ottawa. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Adrian Wyld
Federal minister touts need for new B.C. economic development agency

Last December’s federal economic update promised a stimulus package of about $100 billion this year

Join Black Press Media and Do Some Good
Join Black Press Media and Do Some Good

Pay it Forward program supports local businesses in their community giving

Cannabis bought in British Columbia (Ashley Wadhwani/Black Press Media)
Is it time to start thinking about greener ways to package cannabis?

Packaging suppliers are still figuring eco-friendly and affordable packaging options that fit the mandates of Cannabis Regulations

FILE - In this Nov. 20, 2017, file photo, Larry King attends the 45th International Emmy Awards at the New York Hilton, in New York. Former CNN talk show host King has been hospitalized with COVID-19 for more than a week, the news channel reported Saturday, Jan. 2, 2021. CNN reported the 87-year-old King contracted the coronavirus and was undergoing treatment at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles. (Photo by Andy Kropa/Invision/AP, File)
Larry King, broadcasting giant for half-century, dies at 87

King conducted an estimated 50,000 on-air interviews

BC Coroners Service is currently investigating a death at Canoe Cove Marina and Boatyard in North Saanich. (Black Press Media File)
Drowning death in North Saanich likely B.C.’s first in for 2021

Investigation into suspected drowning Monday night continues

Most Read