‘Paper bag rapist’ Oughton agrees he is a risk

John Horace Oughton agrees with a recent prison psychiatric assessment that found the man known as the “paper bag rapist” was a high risk to re-offend if he was granted parole.

The surprise admission was contained in the 62-year-old Oughton’s letter to the National Parole Board the day before he was scheduled to appear for a Sept. 20 parole review.

John Horace Oughton agrees with a recent prison psychiatric assessment that found the man known as the “paper bag rapist” was a high risk to re-offend if he was granted parole.

The surprise admission was contained in the 62-year-old Oughton’s letter to the National Parole Board the day before he was scheduled to appear for a Sept. 20 parole review.

In the letter, Oughton announced he was withdrawing from the hearing, claiming it was on the advice of his lawyer.

He complained that the review panel had already made up its mind and said he “agreed with the psychological opinion dated July 15, 2011.”

The psychologist who did the assessment had rated Oughton’s risk to re-offend “generally, violently and sexually” as high.

It was only the latest in a long run of mental health assessments that all rated Oughton as a dangerously manipulative personality who cannot be trusted to control himself outside prison.

The Oughton letter was described in a just-released parole board decision denying him any form of supervised release from prison.

Oughton was declared a dangerous offender in 1986, after he admitted to sexually assaulting more than 140 women and children during a 10-year rampage that included Burnaby, Langley and other Lower Mainland communities.

Under Canadian law, a person declared a dangerous offender is jailed with no release date but is entitled to a review of parole eligibility every two years.

The 61-year-old former hot tub salesman was nicknamed the “paper bag rapist” for his habit of placing coverings over his face or the faces of his victims.

Two of them were 11-year-olds from Langley.

The new parole board report shows Oughton has become less and less co-operative over the years of his imprisonment.

He now refuses to attend sex offender counseling, claiming he should have a different type of therapy than that provided in prison.

The last time he showed up for group therapy in 2000, Oughton “showed little respect for the privacy of the other men in the group and tried to intimidate and dominate the facilitator,” the parole board noted.

He was kicked out of the program.

Oughton has racked up 39 “institutional charges” or violations of prison rules since he was jailed, most recently challenging another inmate to a fight and refusing to be locked up in his cell. These offences landed him in “involuntary segregation” or what used to be called solitary confinement.

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Comments are closed

Just Posted

VIDEO: Car goes off Highway 1 and into a ditch in Chilliwack

Eastbound vehicle left the highway ending in the ditch on south side of Luckakuck Way

Emergency crews respond to ATV rollover near Harrison

ATV rolled over on or near Harrison East Forest Service Road near Harrison Hot Springs

Guilty verdict for one of two men in large illegal marijuana grow-operation in Chilliwack

Charges dismissed against property owner where 3,200 plants, 32 kgs of dried weed found in 2017

Cubs rescued, hunter fined after sow shot in Skagit Valley

Officers opt for fines, as hefty punishment could prevent hunter cooperation in future

95-site RV camping to be built in Manning Park

RV park one of first to be built in a provincial park

VIDEO: Musqueam Chief captures captivating footage of bald eagle catching meal

‘This is why we have chosen to live here since time immemorial,’ Chief Wayne Sparrow’s nephew says

Semi and BMW collide on South Surrey highway

At least one person to hospital, both vehicles sustained significant damage

Police ramp up efforts to get impaired drivers off B.C. roads this summer

July is dedicated to the Summer CounterAttack Impaired Driving Campaign

Migrant workers stage multi-city action for full status amid COVID-19 risks

‘COVID-19 has exacerbated an existing crisis’

Okanagan school drops ‘Rebels’ sports team name, citing links with U.S. Civil War

Name and formerly-used images “fly in the face” of the district’s human rights policy, says board chair

PHOTOS: B.C.’s top doc picks up personalized Fluevog shoes, tours mural exhibition

Murals of Gratitude exhibit includes at least one portrait of Henry alongside paintings of health-care workers

Langley vigil demands justice for Ontario animal activist killed protesting slaughterhouse

More than two dozen people gathered at Britco Pork to remember Regan Russell, and fight Bill 156

In troubled times: Independence Day in a land of confusion

Buffeted by invisible forces and just plain worn out, the United States of America celebrates its 244th birthday

Stop enforcing sex work laws during COVID-19, advocates say

There are provisions in Canada’s prostitution laws that make workers immune from prosecution, but not from arrest

Most Read