A TransLink bus pulls up to the 203rd Street stop near Industrial Avenue in Langley. The transportation company announced April 20 it is planning to expand rapid bus services and active transportation over the next 10 years. (Dan Ferguson/Langley Advance Times)

A TransLink bus pulls up to the 203rd Street stop near Industrial Avenue in Langley. The transportation company announced April 20 it is planning to expand rapid bus services and active transportation over the next 10 years. (Dan Ferguson/Langley Advance Times)

TransLink aims to expand rapid bus service, active transport in next 10 years

Regional bus services will double, along with increased bike and walkways

Metro Vancouver residents should have far easier access to active transportation routes in the next decade.

In an announcement Wednesday (April 20), TransLink said it plans to spend the next 10 years doubling its regional bus service, expanding its rapid bus service, and completing the majority of its new bike and walkways.

Within the decade, it said 75 per cent of planned bikways and 66 per cent of new walkways will be complete.

Rapid transit, it explained, differs from regular bus service in that customers prepay before boarding, buses have their own traffic lanes and receive signal priority over other vehicles, and buses have more spacious interiors to allow higher passenger capacities. It is significantly cheaper than SkyTrain investments at $15-million per kilometre, versus $400 million per kilometre for the train.

This new rapid system is expected to be implemented on Hastings Street, King George Boulevard, Langley-Haney Place, Lougheed Highway, Lynn Valley, Metrotown-Park Royal, Marine Drive Station-22nd Street Station, Richond Centre, and Scott Road.

The transportation company didn’t offer an estimate on how much the work will cost, but said it will require an “ambitious” investment and partnerships with all levels of government.

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