Around 30 bandanas bearing the Confederate flag were destroyed in front of Your Dollar Store with More in Summerland on July 18. One of the bandanas purchased at the store had been displayed for participants in an anti-racism rally on July 16. (John Arendt - Summerland Review)

VIDEO: Summerland mayor destroys bandanas with Confederate symbol

Confederate flag shown at anti-racism parade on July 16 had been purchased at local store

After learning that a Confederate flag shown at an anti-racism parade had been purchased in the community, Summerland mayor Toni Boot confronted the store owner and destroyed all the Confederate flags from the store.

On Saturday, July 18 around noon, Boot, along with two close friends, met with Allan Carter, owner of Your Dollar Store with More, where the flag had been purchased. News media were present during the interaction.

“You are perpetrating racism in our town and I will not stand for it,” Boot told Carter.

READ ALSO: Man apologizes for displaying Confederate flag at anti-racism parade in Summerland

READ ALSO: Confederate flag seen along anti-racism parade route in Summerland

Over the past week, the community of Summerland has been faced with racism.

On the evening of July 13, the home of an Indo-Canadian family was vandalized and racist graffiti was spray painted on the walls.

Then, on July 16, during an anti-racism parade in support of the family, a vehicle parked along the parade route displayed the Confederate flag while participants drove past.

The Confederate flag features a blue X with 13 white stars on a red background. It was adopted by the Confederate States of America during the Civil War in the 1860s. Today, many associate the flag with slavery and racism.

Carter said large bandanas with the Confederate flag had been pulled from the store shelves after hearing of the incident. He said the bandanas with the Confederate flag design would no longer be sold at the store.

Boot has compared the Confederate flag symbol with the swastika, used by Nazi Germany in the 1930s and 1940s.

“Why did you bring them in?” Boot asked.

“Because people want them,” Carter replied.

While Boot offered to buy all remaining bandanas with the Confederate flag, Carter gave them to her instead. There were around 30 bandanas.

Outside, in front of the store, Boot and her friends tore up the bandanas and threw the remains in the garbage.

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