White Rock kids stick anti-impaired driving messages to 3,000 liquor store bags

White Rock RCMP Const. Chantal Sears and a handful of kids at Treehouse childcare affix stickers bearing images created by the kids to bags that will be distributed by the city’s three private liquor stores starting Friday. (Tracy Holmes photo)White Rock RCMP Const. Chantal Sears and a handful of kids at Treehouse childcare affix stickers bearing images created by the kids to bags that will be distributed by the city’s three private liquor stores starting Friday. (Tracy Holmes photo)
Elly Lee, 6, hands Treehouse manager Lisa Belanger one of the stickers bearing images she and 22 fellow Treehouse kids created, which will be on brown-sleeve bags that will be distributed by the city’s three private liquor stores starting Friday. (Tracy Holmes photo)Elly Lee, 6, hands Treehouse manager Lisa Belanger one of the stickers bearing images she and 22 fellow Treehouse kids created, which will be on brown-sleeve bags that will be distributed by the city’s three private liquor stores starting Friday. (Tracy Holmes photo)
Twenty-three designs created by Treehouse kids are being added to 3,000 brown-sleeve liquor bags this week. The bags will be distributed by the city’s three private liquor stores starting Friday. (Tracy Holmes photo)Twenty-three designs created by Treehouse kids are being added to 3,000 brown-sleeve liquor bags this week. The bags will be distributed by the city’s three private liquor stores starting Friday. (Tracy Holmes photo)
Chelsea Huang, surrounded by classmates (from left) Adriana Dalgetty, Elly Lee, Matteo McLaughlin, Alexandra Cox and Grayson Sears arranges a display of some of the sticker-adorned bags Tuesday. (Tracy Holmes photo)Chelsea Huang, surrounded by classmates (from left) Adriana Dalgetty, Elly Lee, Matteo McLaughlin, Alexandra Cox and Grayson Sears arranges a display of some of the sticker-adorned bags Tuesday. (Tracy Holmes photo)
Grayson Sears, Joshua Lee, Chelsea Huang, Alexandra Cox, Adriana Dalgetty, Elly Lee and Matteo McLaughlin show some of the ‘Think of Me’ sticker designs, prior to helping affix them to a stack of brown-sleeve bags. (Tracy Holmes photo)Grayson Sears, Joshua Lee, Chelsea Huang, Alexandra Cox, Adriana Dalgetty, Elly Lee and Matteo McLaughlin show some of the ‘Think of Me’ sticker designs, prior to helping affix them to a stack of brown-sleeve bags. (Tracy Holmes photo)

Kids at Treehouse Child Development Centre in White Rock have a thing or two to say to those who plan to tipple this holiday season – mainly, don’t get behind the wheel afterwards.

And as of Friday, their messages are going to be hard for anyone shopping at the city’s three private liquor stores to miss.

That’s because 3,000 brown-sleeve bags bearing stickers with colourful images of things important to the kids – family members and activities they like to participate in among them – along with ‘Think of Me’ statements, are to be distributed to customers starting Nov. 29.

It’s hoped the campaign gives those who are buying alcohol pause, and encourages them to think about potential consequences of not being responsible with it.

The kids were recruited to share the messages by Const. Chantal Sears, who spearheaded the ‘Think of Me’ initiative in collaboration with Families for Justice founder Markita Kaulius, the City of White Rock, the liquor stores, ICBC, Semiahmoo Community Safety Society and Treehouse, with cost of the stickers shared by the safety society, ICBC and the city.

It launches one week ahead of the detachment’s Dec. 6 Christmas Counter Attack kick-off.

READ MORE: Faces of victims shared with White Rock drivers, as CounterAttack launches provincewide

Tuesday, seven of the kids whose designs are among 23 that were made into stickers helped affix a handful of the messages onto a stack of the brown bags.

Adriana Delgatty’s sticker bears the words ‘Please don’t Drink and Drive,’ above a picture she drew of her family and a Christmas tree. She said she picked the image because her mom likes to take family photos and, “because I like opening presents.”

Alexandra Cox’s sticker reads ‘Think of Me Don’t Drink and Drive’ above an image of snowmen, because she and her family like to build snowmen in Bakerview Park.

Treehouse manager Lisa Belanger said prior to creating their designs, she and the children talked about “appealing to people’s hearts” and how to get across to those who choose to drink and drive that “they were affecting innocent people.”

Delgatty put it in simple terms: “Innocent people get hurt by people who choose a wrong decision,” she said.

According to ICBC, there are an average of 1,400 impaired-driving-related crashes in the Lower Mainland every year. The incidents kill around 17 people and injure another 860.

Belanger told Peace Arch News she is familiar with “the terrible things that can happen around drinking and driving.” When she was a teenager, her parents spoke of two incidents impacting their friends, she explained. In one, a young man lost his leg; in the second, the adult son of another couple was killed when he was struck by an impaired driver while crossing a Langley road.

Sears – whose son, Grayson, was among children to create this year’s sticker designs – said she is optimistic the children’s sticker messages will sink in.

“I sure hope so,” she said.

At the same time, she said after 15 years of doing Counter Attack, “I’m still surprised at the amount of impaired drivers we have.”

The bags initiative is not the first time that Peninsula children have been asked to help raise awareness through ‘Think of Me’ campaigns.

Past efforts include getting White Rock and Peace Arch Elementary students to decorate 300 brown-sleeve liquor bags for distribution in 2012. Their messages included “Rudolph will know you did it” and “We are not cats, we only live once.”

As well, at the start of this school year, Surrey RCMP launched a ‘Think of Me’ campaign at Crescent Park Elementary, to remind motorists to take extra care in school zones. In that effort, volunteers stopped every vehicle in front of the school to hand motorists cards designed by students that included tips for both pedestrians and drivers.

READ MORE: RCMP target Surrey school zones

Tuesday, Belanger said it’s important for children to know they have the power to effect change, at any age.

“Never think that it’s too young to start talking about things like this,” she said.

Just Posted

The Agassiz-Harrison Museum celebrates Indigenous Peoples Day on June 21 with special information about The Stó:lō Nation, culture, language and more. (Graphic/Agassiz-Harrison Museum)
Agassiz-Harrison Museum to celebrate Indigenous Peoples Day

June 21 will feature info about local First Nations culture, language and more

Brandon Hobbs (turquoise shirt), brother of missing Abbotsford man Adam Hobbs, gathers with other family and friends to distribute posters in Chilliwack on Thursday, June 17, 2021. (Jenna Hauck/ Chilliwack Progress)
Search efforts expand to Chilliwack and beyond for missing Abbotsford man

Family, friends put up posters in Chilliwack, Agassiz, Hope for missing 22-year-old Adam Hobbs

A CH-149 Cormorant from 442 Transport and Rescue Squadron out of CFB Comox on a training exercise in Chilliwack on June 16, 2021. (William Snow photo)
VIDEO: Military search and rescue training in Chilliwack Wednesday

CH-149 Cormorant and CC-115 Buffalo from CFB Comox participated in downed aircraft rescue simulation

Stock photo by LEEROY Agency from Pixabay
Drop-in vaccination clinics slated in Abbotsford for construction workers

Among three sites in Lower Mainland holding no-appointment clinics in June and July

People line up to get their COVID-19 vaccine at a vaccination centre, Thursday, June 10, 2021 in Montreal. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Ryan Remiorz
Vaccines, low COVID case counts increase Father’s Day hope, but risk is still there

Expert says people will have to do their own risk calculus before popping in on Papa

An old growth cedar stands in a cut-block within the Caycuse Valley. More than 100 prominent Canadians, have signed an open letter calling for the immediate protection of all remaining old-growth forests in B.C. (Submitted)
Brian Mulroney and Greta Thunberg among 100 celebrities pushing to save B.C. old growth

List includes Indigenous leaders, scientists, authors, Oscar winners

The border crossing into the United States is seen during the COVID-19 pandemic in Lacolle, Que. on Friday, February 12, 2021. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Paul Chiasson
U.S. border restrictions to remain in place until at least July 21

Safety minister says Canada, U.S. extending restrictions on non-essential international travel

Helen Austin performing with Trent Freeman at the 2018 Vancouver Island MusicFest. Austin is one of the many performers listed for the 2021 event.
Vancouver Island MusicFest goes virtual for 2021

Black Press to stream 25 hours of programming July 9-11

Himalayan Life helped finance the construction of Nepal’s Yangri Academic Centre and dormitories after a 2015 earthquake devastated the valley, killing more than 9,000 people. (Screen grab/Peter Schaeublin)
B.C. charity founder pledges to rebuild Nepalese school swept away by flash floods

6 years after a catastrophic earthquake killed more than 9,000 people, Nepal gets hit again

Join Black Press Media and Do Some Good
Join Black Press Media and Do Some Good

Pay it Forward program supports local businesses in their community giving

Cannabis bought in British Columbia (Ashley Wadhwani/Black Press Media)
Is it time to start thinking about greener ways to package cannabis?

Packaging suppliers are still figuring eco-friendly and affordable packaging options that fit the mandates of Cannabis Regulations

FILE – A science class at L.A. Matheson Secondary in Surrey, B.C. on March 12, 2021. (Lauren Collins/Surrey Now Leader)
Teachers’ union wants more COVID transmission data as B.C. prepares for back-to-school

BCTF says that details will be important as province works on plan for September

Provincial health officer Dr. Bonnie Henry outlines B.C.’s COVID-19 restart plan, May 25, 2021, including larger gatherings and a possible easing of mandatory masks on July 1. (B.C. government photo)
B.C. records 120 new COVID-19 cases, second vaccines accelerating

Lower Pfizer deliveries for early July, Moderna shipments up

Most Read