X gender identity now recognized on B.C. IDs

Government-issued identification now offer male, female and X under gender field

British Columbians who do not identify as male or female now have the choice to select an X in the gender field of B.C.-issued identification cards.

The option, which came into effect on Nov. 1, applies to driver’s licenses, identity cards, birth certificates and BC Service Cards.

The NDP government first announced changes last summer, following several calls across the country for non-binary identification options. During the same summer, a Nelson baby became the first person in Canada to be issued a health card without a gender designation.

It aligns with emerging national and international standards established by Passport Canada and the United Nations’ International Civil Aviation Organization.

Citizens’ services minister Jinny Sims said in a news release Friday that the change is moving B.C. into the 21st century when it comes to gender identity.

READ MORE: B.C. filmmaker receives non-binary birth certificate

The lack of offering an alternative has resulted in a number of Human Rights Tribunal cases, Attorney General David Eby said.

Trans Care BC project manager Gwen Haworth said the move will open up resources to many in the transgender community.

“As a trans individual, I know from personal experience that having identification documents that reflect who I am positively affecting my access to education, employment, housing, healthcare and much more,” Haworth said.

The province is also exploring next steps required to move to a non-medical model of gender identity to advance equity and inclusivity.

To change a gender designation on an identity document, people born in B.C. must submit several documents to the

Vital Statistics Agency, including a physician or psychologist’s confirmation form. Once complete, the agency will issue a new birth certificate that can be used to change other identification cards.

Those born outside of B.C. can only change their B.C.-issued IDs, which excludes birth certificates.


@ashwadhwani
ashley.wadhwani@bpdigital.ca

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

Just Posted

German-born British Columbian warns against a ‘yes’ vote on proportional representation

Agassiz realtor Freddy Marks says PR in his home country shows party elites can never be voted out

Agassiz teacher’s Amazing Race takes students on Canada-wide adventure

AESS students say they had the experience of a life time

WATCH: Brother of missing Hope woman makes emotional appeal for more media attention

Next search for Shawnee Inyallie Nov. 18 along Highway 1 towards Boston Bar

Gas price drop expected to hit Fraser Valley today

Analyst says to take advantage, warns slight increase may follow

Players Guild challenges Chilliwack residents to solve classic Agatha Christie whodunit mystery

The Chilliwack Players Guild is performing Murder on the Nile from Nov. 22 to Dec. 2

Winter weather hits parts of Canada

As some parts of the country brace for cold, parts of B.C. remain warmer than 10 C

Don’t sign USMCA until LGBTQ language excised, U.S. lawmakers urge Trump

The trade agreement, forged after 13 months of tense negotiations between Canada and the U.S. is scheduled for Nov. 30

US official: US intel says prince ordered Khashoggi killing

Vice-President Mike Pence told reporters that ‘the murder of Jamal Khashoggi was an atrocity.’

Giants serve up major defeat to Pats at Langley Events Centre

On the ice, Vancouver G-Men wrap up home stand with a 10-4 win over Regina Friday night.

Canada’s health system commendable overall but barriers to care remain: UN

The United Nations says Canada’s health care system is “commendable” overall but vulnerable groups still face barriers to quality care.

Unique technology gives children with special needs more independent play

UVic’s CanAssist refined seven prototypes aided by $1.5M government contribution

Kelly Ellard’s boyfriend has statutory release revoked

Darwin Duane Dorozan had several parole infractions that found him ‘unmanageable’

Doctor’s note shouldn’t be required to prove you’re sick: poll

70% of Canadians oppose allowing employers to make you get a sick note

Most Read