Premier Sandy Silver, and Chief Medical Officer Dr. Brendan Hanley at the Government of Yukon COVID-19 press conference in Whitehorse, Yukon on June 2. The Yukon government provided more details on phase two of the reopening plan at a June 24 COVID-19 update. (Alistair Maitland Photography)

Yukon to reopen travel from B.C., N.W.T. and Nunavut on Canada Day

Travellers from B.C. and the other territories will not have to self-isolate if they visit

Come phase two of the Yukon’s reopening plan, residents from British Columbia, the Northwest Territories and Nunavut will be able to enter the territory without self-isolating for 14 days.

Premier Sandy Silver and the Chief Medical Officer of Health Dr. Brendan Hanley provided more information about phase two, scheduled to begin July 1, during the June 24 COVID-19 update.

Silver announced that B.C., N.W.T. and Nunavut residents will be able to come to the territory effective that date and not be subject to isolation orders. These residents will have to provide some kind of proof of address to show they are from the jurisdiction they claim.

The government has not yet determined what documents will be accepted as proof of address, but Silver said a driver’s licence will be sufficient and that other options are being considered.

He clarified that anyone from these three jurisdictions will only be exempt from isolation orders if they travel directly from their home jurisdiction to the Yukon. If someone from Nunavut had to make stops between the territory and the Yukon, that individual could still be exempt provided the stops were in either N.W.T. or B.C.

“We appreciate that travel from Nunavut would involve a stop, so as long as the travellers are still within the Northwest Territories and British Columbia, that would be acceptable,” Silver said.

Hanley added that these residents will not just be waved through; they will have to sign a declaration stating they do not have symptoms of COVID-19.

Other restrictions that will be lifted for phase two will be the limit of 50 per cent capacity for restaurants. Restaurants will be able to operate at up to 100 per cent capacity, provided physical distancing is still in place.

“If you have the ability to maintain social distancing … then you can do that (full capacity),” Silver said. “It’s just that a lot of restaurants won’t have that ability. They have closed in spaces.”

Updated guidelines for restaurants will be available before phase two begins.

The government is working with the City of Whitehorse to help support restaurants expand outside as another way to increase their capacity.

Public pools with an approved operational plan can reopen in phase two. Plans must be submitted for approval and the Public Health and Safety Act must be adhered to.

Farmers markets will be able to welcome non-food vendors in phase two, but information booths remain prohibited. Markets can also have seating and an outdoors dining area.

Silver also gave some information about phase three. The tentative start for this phase could be as early as July 15. He explained phases could last a couple of weeks to a month depending on the epidemiology of the virus.

This could lead to allowing residents from the remaining provinces access to the Yukon, but the two-week isolation period would remain. More details will be released later on this.

Silver explained the work that needs to be done is making sure communities are ready for the next phase.

Hanley said opening up the territory means being vigilant with spacing, hand washing and other preventative measures.

Contact Gord Fortin at gord.fortin@yukon-news.com

CoronavirusYukon

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Comments are closed

Just Posted

Upper Fraser Valley RCMP re-open community policing offices

CPOs have been closed for weeks in response to the COVID-19 pandemic, but re-opened Tuesday

RCMP ask for assistance to find missing Chilliwack man

Raymond Gene Jarvis has been missing since early July

Popkum fire chief urges caution after Saturday rescue from Bridal Veil Falls

11-year-old boy was stable, fire chief Walter Roos said, when delivered to a waiting ambulance

Chilliwack RCMP seeing surge in telephone-based tax scam

Victims are phoned by someone claiming to represent the Canada Revenue Agency, demanding money

Recent surge in COVID-19 cases not unexpected amid Phase Three of reopening: B.C.’s top doc

Keep circles small, wear masks and be aware of symptoms, Dr. Bonnie Henry says

Thousands of dollars of stolen rice traced to Langley warehouse

Police raid seizes $75,000 in ‘commercial scale’ theft case

UPDATE: Mission spray park closed after children suffer swollen eyes, burns

Mission RCMP are investigating incident that injured several children

B.C. NDP changing WorkSafeBC regulations to respond to COVID-19

Employers say reclassifying coronavirus could be ‘ruinous’

Baby raccoon rescued from 10-foot deep drainage pipe on Vancouver Island

‘Its cries were loud, pitiful and heartbreaking,’ Saanich animal control officer says

Statistical flaws led to B.C. wolf cull which didn’t save endangered caribou as estimated

Study finds statistical flaws in an influential 2019 report supporting a wolf cull

Surrey’s first Ethics Commissioner brings ‘objectivity’ to the job

Vancouver lawyer Reece Harding is Surrey’s first Ethics Commissioner, also a first for B.C.

Windows broken, racist graffiti left on Okanagan home

Family says nothing like this has happened since they moved to Summerland in 1980s

19 times on 19th birthday: Langley teen goes from crutches to conquering Abby Grind

Kaden Van Buren started at midnight on Saturday. By 3 p.m. he had completed the trek 19 times.

Most Read