The public can now tune into the Chilliwack School Board meetings on Youtube, either as a livestream or an archived video. (Youtube)

Column: Fireworks not the only reason to tune into school board meetings

Chilliwack trustees take step to be more transparent just as discussions around table heat up

Grab the popcorn and clear your Tuesday evening schedule, there’s a new show in town.

The Chilliwack School Board livestreamed Youtube channel kicked off on Oct. 17, their most recent meeting. It took years of discussion, constant prodding by Trustee Heather Maahs, fiddling with wording, arguing about costs and debating the style of delivery. But it’s finally here.

The board is communicating with the public in a major way with this move, and it’s worth a watch. It was a strange coincidence that the first broadcasted meeting was so dramatic. Dozens of parents filled the chairs, lined the walls around the board table and milled about in the lobby where a television screen relayed the meeting from the next room.

It was an incredible show of force. They were there to voice concerns over the redrawing of catchment boundaries, a change many of them felt would cause stress and even danger to their children. Also unusual was that almost all of the two-hour meeting was dedicated to this specific discussion.

I can tell you, this is all highly unusual. It’s also incredibly exciting. I’ve been covering the local board meetings and education in general here since late 2014. Prior to that, I covered the Fraser Cascade district for about seven years. In all of that time, the only meeting I can recall that was standing-room only was one to fight the closure of a Hope school. Despite an emotional meeting that included some teachers in tears, the closure went ahead anyway.

School board meetings aren’t always full of these fireworks. But just like the last one, the next few will surely be worth tuning into.

There is the aforementioned-boundary change issue, and the related issue of reconfiguration (moving middle school down to a Grade 6 through 8 model). And of course, there is sure to be discussion of the sex orientation and gender identity (SOGI) policies in the school district, after Trustee Barry Neufeld kicked that particular hornets nest a few weeks back.

That prompted a backlash from many, drew supporters out of the woodwork, and lead to Neufeld issuing an apology of sorts. In response, the district published clarification on their SOGI policy, in full support of the B.C.-wide curriculum.

So you can bet that discussion is far from over.

Then there are the now-perennial problems around over-capacity schools, along with the usual budget updates and housekeeping items. Sure, every now and then someone tells a joke, or throws a barb across the table, or says something incredibly stupid. They are human, after all. But as time goes on, it’s important to remember that everything that the board discusses affects our students, our future.

It matters when the board approves a budget, or gives the go-ahead for a study. It matters when a teacher steps to the podium to tell the board about her underfunded but well-loved program. It matters when a board member stands up for what he or she believes in. It matters when parents, teachers, students and staff show up to voice their concerns.

And as we inch toward municipal and school elections (Oct. 20, 2018), it’s becoming increasing clear that it matters who is making these big decisions, and why, and how.

Of course, some trustees have suggested that nobody would want to watch; that their meetings are too boring. Well, the current view count on the last meeting is well over 700.

No matter if you agree with the board’s decisions or not, the fact that they worked for years with district staff to bring these discussions directly into people’s homes should be respected by all. It’s a good, fresh start to a new way of communicating with the public — openly, transparently and firmly in the digital age.

Just Posted

Fundraiser for teenager hit by car in Rosedale

Teen suffering multiple fractures and blood clots following incident on Yale Road

Vedder River cleanup nets bag of discarded sex toys

Chilliwack volunteers stumble on unexpected find while removing 600 lbs of trash from riverway

Hikers alert after woman approached by suspicious man in Harrison Mills

The woman and her family were hiking in the wetlands between Rowena’s Inn and Sts’ailes First Nation

Chilliwack International Spring Film Series returns to Cottonwood 4 Cinemas

Put a spring in your step with the Chilliwack International Spring Film Series’ feature titles

EDITORIAL: No think-tank report cards for the Observer

Fraser Institute’s annual school ranking isn’t a good measure of success, editor Grace Kennedy writes

Film crews descend on Agassiz for ‘Republic of Sarah’

Pioneer Avenue will be closed to traffic Monday and Tuesday

British Columbians are paying more for booze but also broccoli

Victoria’s inflation was 2.3 per cent, a tick above Vancouver’s of 2.2 per cent

UPDATED: Three dead in Surrey crash: police

Single-vehicle crash occurred around 10:30 a.m., police remain on-scene

Eviction halted for B.C. woman deemed ‘too young’ for seniors’ home

Zoe Nagler, 46, had been given notice after living in the seniors complex in Comox for six years

Is it a homicide? B.C. woman dies in hospital, seven months after being shot

Stepfather think Chilliwack case should now be a homicide, but IHIT has not confirmed anything

Coroner’s inquest announced for Victoria teen’s overdose death

Elliot Eurchuk was 16 years old when he died of an opioid overdose at his Oak Bay home

Military officer accused of sexual misconduct, drunkenness in B.C., Alberta

Warrant Officer Jarvis Kevin Malone is charged under the National Defence Act

Stranger climbs onto B.C. family’s second-floor balcony, lights fire in barbecue

Incident in Abbotsford terrifies family with two-year-old boy

Harbour Air to convert to all-electric seaplanes

Seaplane company to modify fleet with a 750-horsepower electric motor

Most Read