Harrison Happenings: Let’s hear It for The Observer

Paper expands to include Hope

Our local newspaper, the Agassiz-Harrison Observer, is expanding to Hope and congratulations are in order!  Actually, they are long overdue for quite a while now.  I have seen our newspaper getting bigger, bolder and better. And now, there is even “Hope for more”!

Jessica Peters and her staff are doing an excellent job.  Local newspapers are the pulse of a community and ideally should be situated in the heart of it.  So, when they moved their office to the new place,  a replica of the old Aberdeen Hotel situated in the Pioneer Park, I thought it was perfect.

Local newspapers are extremely important. While provincial, national and international news can be seen on television and read about in a myriad of larger newspapers, we would be in dire straights without local “observers”!  I myself, for instance, watch most news on T.V. and I also read editorials and contributions of some of the larger newspapers but, I have to admit that I am really looking forward to our own local newspaper. This is about our own life, about happenings around here – it is about us!  Where else can we get this news? But, to put together a newspaper week after week, ready for printing and delivery at certain times, cannot be an easy task.  As the saying goes, “yesterday’s news is today’s old shoes”, so time is of the essence.  And if, lo and behold, the newspaper is not delivered on time, they surely get to hear about it! After all, we appreciate things the most when we miss it.

I had my first encounter with a newspaper when I was a child. My grandmother, who lived with us, was totally bedridden for sixteen years. Her room was on the second floor of our house and, luckily, she could see the sky through her window and smell the garden.  But her life-line to the world was the daily newspaper which arrived at 5 pm sharp. It was my job to fetch it for her so she could read it first, before she passed it on to other family members.  She also designed crossword puzzles which she contributed to the newspaper.  Small pleasures for others, these were immense pleasures for her. It was this very grandmother, a former teacher, who gave me a headstart  in reading, writing and arithmetic – which all proved invaluable throughout my life.

But, back to the Agassiz-Harrison Observer. Actually, I have been writing for this newspaper for a long time.  When it opened, Rick Froese, the editor at the time, asked  “do you have a story for me?” and that was it.  I enjoy doing this — it gives me great pleasure to “talk” to so many people all at once. In a small town you know all the familiar faces and what would, perhaps, be hard to write for one of the larger papers seems to come easy for a local one. You know the people you write for and it’s fun!

 

Just Posted

Do you hear what I hear? Hundreds attend 52nd annual Agassiz carol festival

Holiday carolers sang the night away and raised almost $2,000 for the food bank

Planning price tag revealed for futuristic ‘We Town’ concept in Abbotsford

Developer says highrises would house 30,000, but Abbotsford mayor says project is in wrong place

Petition for free menstrual products turned over to UFV president

Almost 1,300 signatures collected calling for all campus bathrooms to be stocked

New arts-technology focused high school coming to Chilliwack for 2021

Education Minister announces $15.4 million and January construction start for new southside school

Film club holds birthday bash for 75-year-old Hope Cinema

Hollywood starlet Judy Garland will grace the big screen in Hope on Dec. 19

Agassiz’s Dickens Tea sells out for seventh year

The annual holiday event saw visitors enjoy high tea and historic talks

Swoop airlines adds three destinations in 2020 – Victoria, Kamloops, San Diego

Low-fair subsidiary of WestJet Airlines brings new destinations in April 2020

Aid a priority for idled Vancouver Island loggers, John Horgan says

Steelworkers, Western Forest Products returning to mediation

Navigating ‘fever phobia’: B.C. doctor gives tips on when a sick kid should get to the ER

Any temperature above 38 C is considered a fever, but not all cases warrant a trip to the hospital

Transportation Safety Board finishes work at B.C. plane crash site, investigation continues

Transport Canada provides information bulletin, family of victim releases statement

Trudeau sets 2025 deadline to remove B.C. fish farms

Foes heartened by plan to transition aquaculture found in Fisheries minister mandate letter

Man accused of child sex crimes out on bail: Delta police

Gurchetan Singh Samra, 69, must stay away from — and not communicate with — anyone under 16 years old

Wagon wheels can now be any size! B.C. community scraps 52 obsolete bylaws

They include an old bylaw regulating public morals

Indigenous mother wins $20,000 racial discrimination case against Vancouver police

Vancouver Police Board ordered to pay $20,000 and create Indigenous-sensitivity training

Most Read