Traffic study disappoints

Harrison resident not happy with justification for paid parking in the village

I attended the open house held in memorial Hall and reviewed the traffic calming study presented there by Bunt and associates, who claim to be professionals in this field.

I was very disappointed in the quality of their work which, in my opinion, fell well short of professional standards.

They had obviously not done any research into Harrison’s traffic patterns or even the basic traffic infrastructure, a very necessary first step in understanding the current traffic situation’s evolution and patterns of use.

The first glaring error I noted was that they had Hot Springs Road ending at the Plaza and this was shown as the main traffic artery in the village. How ridiculous to claim that the main flow of traffic in Harrison originates and ends at this plaza.

When I questioned them on this, they seemed not to realize that the provincial highway (Hwy 9) turns east on Lillooet and carries on through the village via Rockwell Drive.  They seemed to be completely unaware of the volume and nature of the traffic passing through the village on this route and actually showed east Lillooet Avenue as a residential street!

Such nonsense remains nonsense, even when presented by ‘professionals’.

I asked them how they had incorporated Harrison’s existing traffic plans and street schedules into their study.

They hadn’t even bothered to look at these, even though these studies and plans form a part of the OCP and the long-term financial forecasts, budgets and infrastructure funding plans.

How can Bunt & Co. claim to have conducted a study when they refuse to recognise that Harrison actually has a traffic plan already in place, all legally adopted and approved, on which land-use and budget decisions are based.

Those existing traffic plans have clearly established the status of streets in Harrison (the street schedule) and their function in the traffic pattern.

You don’t need (or shouldn’t need) Vancouver consultants to help you understand something so basic, simple and fundamental as this in such a small village.

Residential streets carry traffic from that street only and are usually dead-ended like East Echo, East Naismith, Lakberg, Juniper Place etc.

Collector streets provide access to these, such as Miami River Drive, Balsam, Pine, Emerald, and Myng.

Connector streets (eg. Emerald, Alder, Pine) link the two arterial roads (Hot Springs Rd. and McCombs).

In the downtown area, they link Lillooet, Cedar and the Esplanade (eg. St Alice, Maple, Chehalis, Spruce).

The village’s single arterial street is the North-South Eagle-McCombs Drive-McPherson  route.

This was built and paved and bridged with local and provincial funding to provide a type of perimeter road and also to serve as an alternate route to Hot Springs Road which can easily be closed by accidents, fires, trees, bridge problems etc.

It is designated as the official detour route in the emergency plans and must be kept open to all traffic, including trucks, low loaders and the industrial traffic heading up Harrison East Forest Service Road.

It seems pretty clear that the Bunt study was not really a study at all but a cynical attempt to justify the degrading of McCombs Drive from an arterial road to a residential street and support all the misguided obstacles and impediments placed on it by the current council.

As a taxpayer, I resent the wasting of my money on hiring such consultants to cover up the bungling in the management of my community.

I suppose you needed to throw good money after bad when you have wasted so much on the misguided installations on McCombs Drive which have driven traffic off this designated arterial route and into residential neighbourhoods, disturbing the quality of life for so many residents.

 

John Allen

 

Just Posted

#MeToo at work: Employers play a role in fixing culture of harassment

B.C. workplaces are getting ahead of being the next MeToo debacle, calling on experts to train staff

Gallery: Local Lights

Residents of Seabird Island, Agassiz and Harrison show off their Christmas spirit

UPDATE: Evacuations still in place for homes along Rockwell Drive

District of Kent mayor says no one was injured but slope stability remains a concern

#MeToo at work: How reporting sexual harassment works – and how it doesn’t

British Columbians have four options to report harassment or assault, but none of them are easy

Local mother-son duo fight stigma around being ‘different’

New Agassiz residents hope to make connections in community

Week in review – December 15

KHSAR aid rescue, emergency route plans and more

VIDEO: balloons and games and music at Basic for Babies in Langley

Event helps Food Banks stock supplies for infants

Kamloops RCMP warning public to stay away from unfolding domestic dispute

The public is being asked to avoid Sabiston Creek Road off of the highway

Owl found dead after eating rat poison leaves B.C. woman concerned

After finding the owl on her Surrey property, Christine Trozzo says the poison is a concern for kids

Change to CPP death benefit panned as insufficient to cover funeral costs

Funeral Services Association of Canada lobbied governments to raise the value to $3,580

B.C. woman brain injured in crash as a baby gets $1.1 million in damages

Trial heard the woman was 16 months old, being carried by her mother when they were both hit

Court denies WestJet’s bid to toss out discrimination lawsuit of former worker

Mandalena Lewis is suing WestJet over allegations of gender-based discrimination

VIDEO: 3 months later, rescued sea lion released back into ocean

The young animal was found in Campbell River three months ago

Letter: Agassiz resident opposes cell tower

Cites health and environment concerns

Most Read