Pittsburgh Penguins goalie Matt Murray (30) makes a save as Ottawa Senators right wing Mark Stone (61) looks for a the puck during the third period of game six of the Eastern Conference final in the NHL Stanley Cup hockey playoffs in Ottawa on Tuesday, May 23, 2017. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Fred Chartrand

Ottawa Senators sign Mark Stone to a one-year deal worth US$7.35M

The Ottawa Senators avoided arbitration with Mark Stone, signing the winger to a one-year deal Friday.

The Ottawa Senators have avoided arbitration with Mark Stone, signing the winger to a one-year deal worth US$7.35 million on Friday.

The deal came the same day the team and the restricted free agent were set to have a hearing to determine the player’s contract for the 2018-19 season.

Stone had reportedly asked for $9 million in arbitration, while the team countered at $5 million.

The 26-year-old from Winnipeg, who can become an unrestricted free agent next summer, tied for the Senators’ lead with 62 points in a lost 2017-18 campaign.

Ottawa and defenceman Cody Ceci had an arbitration hearing on Wednesday, with the player reportedly asking for $6 million, and the club coming in at $3.35 million. A decision was expected later Friday.

Stone has scored at least 20 goals in each of his four full NHL seasons, and registered a career-high 42 assists last year.

His 381 takeaways since the start of 2014-15 rank him first in the NHL, 84 more than the next closest player.

Selected by the Senators 178th overall at the 2010 draft, Stone has 249 points (95 goals, 154 assists) in 307 NHL games.

Stone, who made $3.5 million in each of the last three seasons, also has five goals and eight assists in his 27 career games.

Related: Ottawa Senators trade Mike Hoffman, less than a week after allegations involving partner

Related: Ottawa Senators forward Chris Neil announces retirement

The Canadian Press

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