Cancer

Bob and Heather Spencer are no strangers to the annual challenge – Bob has participated five times, Heather four times. (Submitted photo)

Abbotsford couple to cycle 550 km in August to fundraise for SickKids Foundation

Bob and Heather Spencer are riding for Heather’s sister, who died from cancer at age of 3

 

Bianca Hayes is an athlete and advocate for ovarian cancer research training for her second trans-Canada ride. (photo/ David and Justina Tam of The Coconut Creative).

B.C. woman starts 5,900 km bike trek across Canada in honour of sister lost to ovarian cancer

The advocate began endurance cycling in 2018 after losing her sister to ovarian cancer

 

Matthew and Kari Atkins have been paying $1,200 a month to treat Kari’s metastatic breast cancer for the last several months. (Submitted photo)

B.C. couple left to foot $1,200-a-month cancer treatment bill due to ‘funding loophole’

Kari and Matthew Atkins hope the government will offer funding for people in their situation

 

People are rallying behind the Drombolis family of North Langley. Dad Shane has been battling a rare form of cancer and mom Kristine was recently diagnosed with the very same condition. (GoFundMe)

Community rallies to help B.C. couple battling rare form of cancer

GoFundMe launched after wife was diagnosed with the same rare cancer husband is fighting

People are rallying behind the Drombolis family of North Langley. Dad Shane has been battling a rare form of cancer and mom Kristine was recently diagnosed with the very same condition. (GoFundMe)
Gord Locke, a director with Volunteer Cancer Drivers Society, says they are seeking more drivers to take people to cancer treatments and doctor appointments. (Gord Locke photo)

More cancer drivers sought from Chilliwack and beyond to sign up as volunteers

So far they’ve made 439 trips to cancer appointments for 67 patients with 16 volunteer drivers

Gord Locke, a director with Volunteer Cancer Drivers Society, says they are seeking more drivers to take people to cancer treatments and doctor appointments. (Gord Locke photo)
Photo courtesy of 2022 Courage To Come Back Awards.
Wright has been a long-time spokesperson for the Michael Cuccione Foundation, a mentor for at-risk youth at the East End Boys Club, and helps fundraise for the BC Children’s Hospital, where he has been a patient for the most of his life. Submitted photo/ Coast Mental Health

Mission actor, childhood cancer survivor honoured for philanthropic work with sick children

Casey Wright, 21, was diagnosed with brain tumour at just 6-months-old

Photo courtesy of 2022 Courage To Come Back Awards.
Wright has been a long-time spokesperson for the Michael Cuccione Foundation, a mentor for at-risk youth at the East End Boys Club, and helps fundraise for the BC Children’s Hospital, where he has been a patient for the most of his life. Submitted photo/ Coast Mental Health
Jessica Peters is a reporter at the Abbotsford News.

COLUMN: Nurses provide more to us than medical care

On National Nurses Week, it’s time to think back to the nurses who have cared for us

Jessica Peters is a reporter at the Abbotsford News.
The White Rock Lake wildfire in North Okanagan is shown burning during the 2021 B.C. wildfire season. (Terry Lawson/Facebook)

B.C. wildfires may be linked to 10% higher chance of brain tumours

New study finds higher incidence of lung cancer and brain tumours due to wildfire exposures

The White Rock Lake wildfire in North Okanagan is shown burning during the 2021 B.C. wildfire season. (Terry Lawson/Facebook)
Firefighters-Cancer 20220505 Vancouver firefighter Jenn Dawkins, shown in a handout photo, lobbied for breast cancer to be included in British Columbia’s legislation as a presumed occupational illness covered by the province’s health and safety agency for workers. Three years later, she would be diagnosed with the disease that is a top killer of firefighters. THE CANADIAN PRESS/HO-David Harcus

Firefighters say recognition of their cancer risk is tough battle across Canada

British Columbia recently amended the Workers Compensation Act to include three more cancers

Firefighters-Cancer 20220505 Vancouver firefighter Jenn Dawkins, shown in a handout photo, lobbied for breast cancer to be included in British Columbia’s legislation as a presumed occupational illness covered by the province’s health and safety agency for workers. Three years later, she would be diagnosed with the disease that is a top killer of firefighters. THE CANADIAN PRESS/HO-David Harcus
Firefighters are covered by workers’ compensation benefits for 13 known high-risk cancers – the province plans to add ovarian, cervical and penile cancers. (Province of BC/Flickr)

B.C. adds 3 cancers to coverage for firefighters – ovarian, cervical, penile

Firefighters covered sooner for testicular, colorectal, esophageal cancers

Firefighters are covered by workers’ compensation benefits for 13 known high-risk cancers – the province plans to add ovarian, cervical and penile cancers. (Province of BC/Flickr)
This 1974 microscope image made available by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention shows changes in cells indicative of adenocarcinoma of the prostate. Some doctors say it’s time to rename low-grade prostate cancer to eliminate the alarming C word. About 34,000 Americans die from prostate cancer annually, but most prostate cancers are harmless. A paper published Monday, April 18, 2022 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology is reviving a debate about dropping the word “cancer” when patients learn the results of these low-risk biopsy findings. (Dr. Edwin P. Ewing, Jr./CDC via AP)

Doctors suggest new names for low-grade prostate cancer

Medical professionals look to eliminate alarming word

This 1974 microscope image made available by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention shows changes in cells indicative of adenocarcinoma of the prostate. Some doctors say it’s time to rename low-grade prostate cancer to eliminate the alarming C word. About 34,000 Americans die from prostate cancer annually, but most prostate cancers are harmless. A paper published Monday, April 18, 2022 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology is reviving a debate about dropping the word “cancer” when patients learn the results of these low-risk biopsy findings. (Dr. Edwin P. Ewing, Jr./CDC via AP)
Vials of blood from a participant in a clinical study of the effectiveness of a new liquid biopsy technology are packaged for shipment at Oregon Health & Science University in Portland, Ore., on March 14, 2022. The clinical trial will follow hundreds of participants for three years to see if signals of any cancers that participants later develop were present in their blood. (AP Photo/Gillian Flaccus)

Can cancer blood tests live up to their promise of saving lives?

U.S. government researchers are planning a large experiment to test effectiveness

Vials of blood from a participant in a clinical study of the effectiveness of a new liquid biopsy technology are packaged for shipment at Oregon Health & Science University in Portland, Ore., on March 14, 2022. The clinical trial will follow hundreds of participants for three years to see if signals of any cancers that participants later develop were present in their blood. (AP Photo/Gillian Flaccus)
Langley’s Ashley Samborski is selling tickets for a chance to buy his car and help fight cancer. (Special to Langley Advance Times)

VIDEO: Son of B.C. cancer victim sells car to help others fight the disease

Donor to a cancer fund for families have a chance to buy Ashley Samborski’s prized Honda Civic

Langley’s Ashley Samborski is selling tickets for a chance to buy his car and help fight cancer. (Special to Langley Advance Times)
Save-On-Foods downtown Chilliwack held a fundraiser for childhood cancer research on March 12, 2022. Long-time store customer Carmen Putz’s son died of a rare form of pediatric cancer in January. (Submitted)

Chilliwack woman fundraising for pediatric cancer research after son’s death

Carmen Putz’s son Dylan diagnosed at 17, died at 19 in January

Save-On-Foods downtown Chilliwack held a fundraiser for childhood cancer research on March 12, 2022. Long-time store customer Carmen Putz’s son died of a rare form of pediatric cancer in January. (Submitted)
Catherine getting ready for the next round of chemo, with her three kids for support. (GoFundMe/Special to The News)

B.C. family in need of support after mother’s stage 4 breast cancer diagnosis

Seek funds to cover treatment and care for their three autism-diagnosed kids

Catherine getting ready for the next round of chemo, with her three kids for support. (GoFundMe/Special to The News)
Chris Isfled (left) of Abbotsford and friend Shawn Bjornsson of Winnipeg ran 30 kilometres across Lake Winnipeg in 2020, raising $20,000 for the Save Your Skin Foundation. This year’s event is being held virtually and invites participation from the public.

Abbotsford man battling cancer holds virtual fundraiser for Save Your Skin Foundation

Chris Isfeld and friend Shawn Bjornsson of Winnipeg hold third annual A Viking’s Challenge

Chris Isfled (left) of Abbotsford and friend Shawn Bjornsson of Winnipeg ran 30 kilometres across Lake Winnipeg in 2020, raising $20,000 for the Save Your Skin Foundation. This year’s event is being held virtually and invites participation from the public.
Steve Fonyo, who raised millions for cancer research by running across Canada on an artificial limb, has died. Fonyo is shown dippping his artifical limb in the Pacific Ocean in Victoria after completing his cross-country run in this 1985 photo. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Chuck Stoody

Steve Fonyo, who lost leg to cancer and ran across Canada to raise funds, dead at 56

Fonyo lost a leg to cancer when he was 12, became a national hero after completing a Canada-wide marathon

Steve Fonyo, who raised millions for cancer research by running across Canada on an artificial limb, has died. Fonyo is shown dippping his artifical limb in the Pacific Ocean in Victoria after completing his cross-country run in this 1985 photo. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Chuck Stoody
Avery, 8, has been a patient of BC Children’s Hospital since she was five years old, receiving treatment for a rare form of cancer. (Submitted photo)

Abbotsford girl, 8, still smiling through years of treatment for rare cancer

Mom says the care they get at BC Children’s Hospital is second to none

Avery, 8, has been a patient of BC Children’s Hospital since she was five years old, receiving treatment for a rare form of cancer. (Submitted photo)
Premier John Horgan makes his first public appearance since completing cancer treatment for Lunar New Year at the B.C. legislature on Tuesday, Feb. 1, 2022. (John Horgan/Twitter)

Horgan celebrates Lunar New Year at B.C. legislature after multi-week cancer treatment

Event was the B.C. premier’s first public appearance since completing cancer treatment

Premier John Horgan makes his first public appearance since completing cancer treatment for Lunar New Year at the B.C. legislature on Tuesday, Feb. 1, 2022. (John Horgan/Twitter)
B.C. Premier John Horgan speaks at a press conference in Vancouver on September 16, 2021. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck

Premier Horgan completes throat cancer treatment, says he’s ‘feeling better every day’

B.C.’s premier was diagnosed with throat cancer in fall 2021

B.C. Premier John Horgan speaks at a press conference in Vancouver on September 16, 2021. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck
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