Great White Sharks

This image released by Warner Bros. Discovery shows a great white shark at the water’s surface. The death of two great white sharks in Atlantic Canada within days is abnormal, say researchers. They’re the ocean’s apex predators, but what caused the deaths is a mystery to researchers. THE CANADIAN PRESS/AP- Warner Bros. Discovery via AP

Deaths of two great whites off Maritimes within weeks ‘highly unusual’: researcher

Great white shark is endangered under the federal Species at Risk Act

 

Ocearch team members work to remove a hook from a shark on board a shark research vessel in LaHave, N.S., Friday, Oct. 4, 2019. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Riley Smith

Researchers see little evidence that more white sharks are prowling North Atlantic

Despite anecodotal evidence, study says number of great whites in Canadian waters holding steady

 

FILE - In this Thursday, Aug. 11, 2016, file photo, the fin of a great white shark is seen swimming a past research boat in the waters off Gansbaai, South Africa. (AP Photo/Schalk van Zuydam, File)

Haddish, Shatner, Paisley join Discovery’s ‘Shark Week’

Celebrities take part in 45 hours of programming to sink your teeth into

 

Drone image of Semiahmoo Bay. With significant water improvement the bay could once more support a shell fish harvest, SFN Chief Harley Chappell says. (Smart Shores photo)

Semiahmoo Bay shellfish harvest could be restored – SFN chief says

White Rock invited to participate in goals of Shared Waters Alliance

Drone image of Semiahmoo Bay. With significant water improvement the bay could once more support a shell fish harvest, SFN Chief Harley Chappell says. (Smart Shores photo)
Meaghen McCord cradles a smoothhound shark (Mustelus mustelus). McCord achieved a Masters Degree in Fisheries Science, where she specialized in the stock assessment and fishery management of commercially fished sharks in South Africa. (Submitted photo)

B.C. marine ecologist wants Canada to sink its teeth into shark protection

Gulf Islands scientist says top predator under shocking threat from human behaviour

Meaghen McCord cradles a smoothhound shark (Mustelus mustelus). McCord achieved a Masters Degree in Fisheries Science, where she specialized in the stock assessment and fishery management of commercially fished sharks in South Africa. (Submitted photo)