Premier of Manitoba Brian Pallister speaks at a news conference at the Manitoba Legislative Building in Winnipeg on Wednesday, April 7, 2021. THE CANADIAN PRESS/David Lipnowski

Provincial leaders want more federal money for health care, plan to meet in fall

Premiers ask Ottawa to increase its share of overall health spending to 35 per cent from 22 per cent

 

FILE - This July 6, 2017 file photo shows prescription drugs in a glass flask at the state crime lab in Taylorsville, Utah. (AP Photo/Rick Bowmer, File)

Contaminants in generic drugs may cause long-term harm to DNA: B.C. researcher

Scientist says findings suggest high volume overseas facilities require strict regulation

 

Minister of Seniors Deb Schulte responds to a question during question period in the House of Commons on Parliament Hill in Ottawa on Friday, Dec. 11, 2020. THE CANADIAN PRESS/ Patrick Doyle

Liberal government moves to define ‘elder abuse’ to better target ways to stop it

Increasing cases of abuse, neglect, financial abuse or abuse of power-of-attorney being flagged

 

In this 2019 photo provided by Biogen, a researcher works on the development of the medication aducanumab in Cambridge, Mass. On Monday, June 7, 2021, the Food and Drug Administration approved aducanumab, the first new drug for Alzheimer’s disease in nearly 20 years, disregarding warnings from independent advisers that the much-debated treatment hasn’t been shown to help slow the brain-destroying disease. (Biogen via AP)

U.S. approves much-debated Alzheimer’s drug aducanumab panned by experts

Drug from Biogen deemed “reasonably likely” to benefit Alzheimer’s patients

In this 2019 photo provided by Biogen, a researcher works on the development of the medication aducanumab in Cambridge, Mass. On Monday, June 7, 2021, the Food and Drug Administration approved aducanumab, the first new drug for Alzheimer’s disease in nearly 20 years, disregarding warnings from independent advisers that the much-debated treatment hasn’t been shown to help slow the brain-destroying disease. (Biogen via AP)
People gather next to the Lachine Canal on a warm spring day in Montreal, Saturday, May 15, 2021, as the COVID-19 pandemic continues in Canada and around the world. A machine learning model used health data collected routinely to predict the majority of people most likely to develop the disease, says the lead author of a study that suggests the findings could be used to create targeted prevention programs years before someone develops the disease. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Graham Hughes

Knowing diabetes risk years ahead could mean targeted prevention, lower costs: study

The data can help develop targeted population-wide strategies to reduce disease prevalence among high-risk groups

People gather next to the Lachine Canal on a warm spring day in Montreal, Saturday, May 15, 2021, as the COVID-19 pandemic continues in Canada and around the world. A machine learning model used health data collected routinely to predict the majority of people most likely to develop the disease, says the lead author of a study that suggests the findings could be used to create targeted prevention programs years before someone develops the disease. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Graham Hughes
Lia Crowe takes a cold water swim in Okanagan Lake in Kelowna. Don Denton photograph

When Cold Is Hot

Cold water swimming is therapy and exercise

  • May 26, 2021
Lia Crowe takes a cold water swim in Okanagan Lake in Kelowna. Don Denton photograph
Cardiac surgeon Dr. Richard Whitlock of Hamilton Health Sciences is the lead author of an international study that found a simple surgery reduces the risk of stroke after blood clots in patients with an irregular heartbeat. THE CANADIAN PRESS/HO, Hamilton Health Sciences

Surgery to prevent strokes in heart patients recommended worldwide: Canadian doctor

A simple surgery to remove a piece of unnecessary tissue in the heart could prevent strokes in patients with a common condition that requires them to take blood thinners

Cardiac surgeon Dr. Richard Whitlock of Hamilton Health Sciences is the lead author of an international study that found a simple surgery reduces the risk of stroke after blood clots in patients with an irregular heartbeat. THE CANADIAN PRESS/HO, Hamilton Health Sciences
Members of the Agassiz-Harrison Lions Club deliver a $5,000 cheque to the Braun family to help build an elevator for young Atticus, age 3. The Brauns received an additional $5,000 from the community in a fundraiser the week before, edging them ever closer to the goal. (Photo/Darcy Striker)

Agassiz family ‘blown away’ by nearly $12,000 in donations for wheelchair elevator

The community organized a nearly $7,000 fundraiser, Lions Club delivered donationcheque

Members of the Agassiz-Harrison Lions Club deliver a $5,000 cheque to the Braun family to help build an elevator for young Atticus, age 3. The Brauns received an additional $5,000 from the community in a fundraiser the week before, edging them ever closer to the goal. (Photo/Darcy Striker)
A Gladstone Secondary School student was diagnosed with the respiratory infection. An exposure notice was sent out Thursday, April 22. (Google Maps)

Case of infectious tuberculosis confirmed at Vancouver high school

The B.C. Centre for Disease Control issued an exposure notice Thursday after a student was diagnosed

A Gladstone Secondary School student was diagnosed with the respiratory infection. An exposure notice was sent out Thursday, April 22. (Google Maps)
National HIV Testing Day is June 27. (Wikimedia Commons photo)

Study looks at how HIV self-tests can help queer people overcome health-care hurdles

Study will send 15,000 free self-test kits to participants across Canada to either use themselves or share with others

National HIV Testing Day is June 27. (Wikimedia Commons photo)
The public health laboratory says providing precise figures for variant cases is challenging, in part because of the delay to complete whole-genome sequencing and because not all the samples can be sequenced. (Medicago)

Variants of concern higher than reported, but giving precise data challenging: BCCDC

Director Mel Krajden attributes it to a delay to complete whole-genome sequencing and not all the samples can be sequenced

The public health laboratory says providing precise figures for variant cases is challenging, in part because of the delay to complete whole-genome sequencing and because not all the samples can be sequenced. (Medicago)
Pixabay

Most kids with serious inflammatory illness had mild COVID-19

The post-infection condition tends to be milder in kids who were sicker with COVID-19, although more than half received intensive hospital care

Pixabay
Suzie Bruce, left, and Ray Bruce, right, holding Ray’s heart after his transplant. His old heart was donated to the Cardiovascular Tissue Registry at the Centre for Heart Lung Innovation, where it will be used for research and educational purposes. (Submitted photo)

Police officer shows a lot of heart in overnight effort to get B.C. senior a new heart

Qualicum Beach man just makes transplant deadline in amazing story out of Vancouver Island

Suzie Bruce, left, and Ray Bruce, right, holding Ray’s heart after his transplant. His old heart was donated to the Cardiovascular Tissue Registry at the Centre for Heart Lung Innovation, where it will be used for research and educational purposes. (Submitted photo)
A disposable face mask is pictured on the ground in east Vancouver, Tuesday, March 9, 2021. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jonathan Hayward

Health Canada issues recall for disposable masks containing graphene

Anyone who has worn a graphene mask should consult their health-care provider if they have concerns such as shortness of breath, difficulty breathing

A disposable face mask is pictured on the ground in east Vancouver, Tuesday, March 9, 2021. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jonathan Hayward
Lisa Ellis plays with her 15-month-old grandson Stirling on March 6, 2021. (Jenna Hauck/ Chilliwack Progress)

Kidney recipient ready to enjoy ‘new lease on life’

Chilliwack’s Lisa Ellis recovering well after life-saving surgey

Lisa Ellis plays with her 15-month-old grandson Stirling on March 6, 2021. (Jenna Hauck/ Chilliwack Progress)
Cousins Lisa Ellis and Brian Nimmo spend time together on March 9, 2021 before their surgery. On March 12, Nimmo donated one of his kidneys to Ellis. (Jenna Hauck/ Chilliwack Progress)

‘Guardian angel’ gives kidney to cousin

Chilliwack woman knew 21 years ago she would need a transplant one day, and that day has come

Cousins Lisa Ellis and Brian Nimmo spend time together on March 9, 2021 before their surgery. On March 12, Nimmo donated one of his kidneys to Ellis. (Jenna Hauck/ Chilliwack Progress)
L to R: Saik’uz First Nation Coun. Jasmine Thomas and Chief Priscilla Mueller (Aman Parhar - Omineca Express)

Northern B.C. addiction treatment centre not off the table yet, says First Nations

Culturally appropriate centre much needed in B.C.’s north

L to R: Saik’uz First Nation Coun. Jasmine Thomas and Chief Priscilla Mueller (Aman Parhar - Omineca Express)
Ruth Bartesko gives some love to Fanny the Shetland pony during an Equine Assisted Learning session at Heart Lake Farm on March 8. Bartesko is one of several participants from the Victoria Brain Injury Society to take part in the new program. (Nina Grossman/News Staff)
Ruth Bartesko gives some love to Fanny the Shetland pony during an Equine Assisted Learning session at Heart Lake Farm March 8. Bartesko is one of several participants from the Victoria Brain Injury Society to take part in the new program. (Nina Grossman/News Staff)

Greater Victoria brain injury survivors harness power of equine connection

Vancouver Island’s Humble Hooves providing a calming presence and a special connection

Ruth Bartesko gives some love to Fanny the Shetland pony during an Equine Assisted Learning session at Heart Lake Farm on March 8. Bartesko is one of several participants from the Victoria Brain Injury Society to take part in the new program. (Nina Grossman/News Staff)
Ruth Bartesko gives some love to Fanny the Shetland pony during an Equine Assisted Learning session at Heart Lake Farm March 8. Bartesko is one of several participants from the Victoria Brain Injury Society to take part in the new program. (Nina Grossman/News Staff)
A B.C. biotech firm is seeking federal approval for the emergency use of a nasal spray, claiming it significantly lessens the impact and severity of COVID-19 for those who use it. (Pixabay)

B.C. biotech firm seeks emergency approval for COVID-killing nasal spray

Clinical trials found SaNOtize reduces virus levels in upper airways by more than 99%, developers say

A B.C. biotech firm is seeking federal approval for the emergency use of a nasal spray, claiming it significantly lessens the impact and severity of COVID-19 for those who use it. (Pixabay)
A recently published study out of UBC has found a link between life satisfaction levels and overall health. (Pixabay)

Satisfied with life? It’s likely you’re healthier for it: UBC study

UBC psychologists have found those more satisfied with their life have a 26% reduced risk of dying

A recently published study out of UBC has found a link between life satisfaction levels and overall health. (Pixabay)