Wildlife

VIDEO: Rare baby owl now being reared by its parents in Lower Mainland sanctuary

VIDEO: Rare baby owl now being reared by its parents in Lower Mainland sanctuary

Chick J is back in the nest with mom and dad as part of a unique Langley breeding program

VIDEO: Rare baby owl now being reared by its parents in Lower Mainland sanctuary
Sayward’s acting mayor, Bill Ives, spotted this grizzly bear in the vicinity while he was out on a walk. (Submitted photo)

After grizzly spotted in B.C. village, mayor warns not to come searching for the bears

Wildlife warnings have been issued in Sayward, but people are ignoring it and going out in search of the bear to get photographs

Sayward’s acting mayor, Bill Ives, spotted this grizzly bear in the vicinity while he was out on a walk. (Submitted photo)
Be bear aware: Seven black bear sightings call in so far in one week

Be bear aware: Seven black bear sightings call in so far in one week

Though a rare sight in area, black bears are still potentially dangerous

Be bear aware: Seven black bear sightings call in so far in one week
In this April 23, 2020, photo provided by the Washington State Department of Agriculture, a researcher holds a dead Asian giant hornet in Blaine, Wash. The world’s largest hornet, a 2-inch long killer with an appetite for honey bees, has been found in Washington state and entomologists are making plans to wipe it out. Dubbed the “Murder Hornet” by some, the Asian giant hornet has a sting that could be fatal to some humans. It is just now starting to emerge from hibernation. (Karla Salp/Washington State Department of Agriculture via AP)

‘Murder Hornets,’ with sting that can kill, land in Washington State

The hornet was sighted for the first time in the U.S. last December

In this April 23, 2020, photo provided by the Washington State Department of Agriculture, a researcher holds a dead Asian giant hornet in Blaine, Wash. The world’s largest hornet, a 2-inch long killer with an appetite for honey bees, has been found in Washington state and entomologists are making plans to wipe it out. Dubbed the “Murder Hornet” by some, the Asian giant hornet has a sting that could be fatal to some humans. It is just now starting to emerge from hibernation. (Karla Salp/Washington State Department of Agriculture via AP)
A white-tailed fawn rests in a clump of grass. (Design Pics)

COVID-19 not leading to increased wildlife, you just have more time on your hands: biologist

People have had more time to actually notice the critters that usually turn up in the spring

A white-tailed fawn rests in a clump of grass. (Design Pics)
A great blue heron goes for a stroll through the waters of Spring Park in Harrison Hot Springs on a spring afternoon. Contributed Photo/Wolf Drescher

Gone fishin’

At Spring Park in Harrison Hot Springs

A great blue heron goes for a stroll through the waters of Spring Park in Harrison Hot Springs on a spring afternoon. Contributed Photo/Wolf Drescher
Baby animals are showing up at Critter Care in greater numbers this year as people find them in their back yards. (Brandon Dean/Special to the Langley Advance Times)

Baby animals flood into B.C.’s Critter Care wildlife shelter

The shelter is also in need of toilet paper, gloves, and bleach

Baby animals are showing up at Critter Care in greater numbers this year as people find them in their back yards. (Brandon Dean/Special to the Langley Advance Times)
Northern Pacific treefrog (Grace Overduin photo)

Fraser Valley Conservancy seeks frog finders from Langley to Hope

Finding tree frogs can be indication of the best kind of habitat available in the Fraser Valley

Northern Pacific treefrog (Grace Overduin photo)
The moat at the Kootenay Trout Hatchery near Cranbrook, where a group of pesky river otters were fishing for meals in the summer of 2019. (Courtesy of Owen Schoenberger)

Trout ‘doing quite well’ at Kootenay hatchery after otters, who ate 150 fish, relocated

River otters had been pillaging a moat outside the facility for months, gobbling up about 150 trout

The moat at the Kootenay Trout Hatchery near Cranbrook, where a group of pesky river otters were fishing for meals in the summer of 2019. (Courtesy of Owen Schoenberger)
Tina Hein of the Raptor Rescue Society holds an eagle that was rescued after it ate poisoned meat on the weekend. The bird is one of several that were being released from care at Island Veterinary Hospital on Tuesday morning. (Chris Bush/News Bulletin)

Ten poisoned eagles rushed to veterinary hospital in Nanaimo

Eagles stricken after eating flesh of euthanized animal at Nanaimo Regional Landfill

Tina Hein of the Raptor Rescue Society holds an eagle that was rescued after it ate poisoned meat on the weekend. The bird is one of several that were being released from care at Island Veterinary Hospital on Tuesday morning. (Chris Bush/News Bulletin)
This yearling, now re-located up north, was spotted up a tree in Trail two weeks ago. This was one of many sightings called into BC Conservation the last week of January. (Submitted photo)

B.C. cub that woke early from hibernation taken to sanctuary

Yearling was taken to Northern Lights Wildlife Society in northern B.C.

This yearling, now re-located up north, was spotted up a tree in Trail two weeks ago. This was one of many sightings called into BC Conservation the last week of January. (Submitted photo)
Deer found entangled in lights in Kimberly, B.C. - Image- BC Conservation.

Deer freed in Kimberley after antlers get tangled up in Christmas lights

Conservation officers found the animal in distress and safely tranquilized it

Deer found entangled in lights in Kimberly, B.C. - Image- BC Conservation.
The yellow-rumped warbler tends to arrive on Vancouver Island in early March. (Black Press Media file)

Despite reports of decline, birds flocking to national parks in Canadian Rockies

Recent studies suggest overall bird population has slid by three billion since 1970

The yellow-rumped warbler tends to arrive on Vancouver Island in early March. (Black Press Media file)
Black bears were the main source of wildlife assistance calls to the local brand of the WildSafe program. (Peter Sulzie/Submitted photo)

WildSafe program wraps up quiet season for District of Kent, Harrison

Black bears biggest source of calls in the FVRD

Black bears were the main source of wildlife assistance calls to the local brand of the WildSafe program. (Peter Sulzie/Submitted photo)
A young bobcat took up residence in a Salmon Arm couple’s bird coop and had to be scared out. (Jim Hilland photo)

VIDEO: Bobcat infiltrates Shuswap couple’s coop, feasts on fowl

Police officers credited for attempting to assist with animal’s extraction

A young bobcat took up residence in a Salmon Arm couple’s bird coop and had to be scared out. (Jim Hilland photo)
Several thousand western toads were migrating through rural properties in South Langley on Wednesday, their move sparked by the heavy rains. (Matthew Claxton/Langley Advance Times)

VIDEO: Wet weather kicks off Lower Mainland toad migration

Thousands of small western toads were making the trek from pond to woods

Several thousand western toads were migrating through rural properties in South Langley on Wednesday, their move sparked by the heavy rains. (Matthew Claxton/Langley Advance Times)
As ducklings can’t yet fly, they are vulnerable to cars when waddling towards water sources. (Peninsula News Review File)

Duck, duck, loose – how to help ducks stay safe on our roads

Why did the duck cross the road? To reach the nearest available water source, says SPCA

As ducklings can’t yet fly, they are vulnerable to cars when waddling towards water sources. (Peninsula News Review File)
Dominique, an intern at Critter Care with Freddy, a young raccoon. (Critter Care Wildlife Society)

Langley wildlife shelter could use help during ‘baby season’

Baby animals are arriving by the hundreds at Critter Care

Dominique, an intern at Critter Care with Freddy, a young raccoon. (Critter Care Wildlife Society)
Glyphosate herbicide is applied to a logged area after seedlings are replanted. (Doug Pitt/Natural Resources Canada)

B.C. forest ministry cutting back on use of herbicide glyphosate

Faster-growing seedlings, need for aspen to provide moose winter feed

Glyphosate herbicide is applied to a logged area after seedlings are replanted. (Doug Pitt/Natural Resources Canada)
Bears coming into communities attracted to improperly stored garbage or fruit remain the biggest source of wildlife conflicts in B.C. (B.C. Conservation Officer Service)

Bear conflicts keep B.C. Conservation Officers busy

Wildlife viewing business faces six charges for baiting bears

Bears coming into communities attracted to improperly stored garbage or fruit remain the biggest source of wildlife conflicts in B.C. (B.C. Conservation Officer Service)
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