(Pxhere)

60% of Canadian workers would take a pay cut for better mental health support: survey

Survey found 77% of workers would leave for better wellness initiatives

If you found a job that paid less but provided better mental health support, would you take it?

According to a survey released Wednesday by Morneau Shepell, 60 per cent of Canadians would.

The human resources firm found even 51 per cent of workers experiencing “high financial stress” said they would take a pay cut in exchange for a more wellness-oriented workplace. If the pay remained the same, the number of workers who would jump ship rose to 77 per cent.

The survey found that 22 per cent of employees considered work their top cause of stress, while 21 per cent cited financial issues.

Nearly half of employees surveyed said the mental demands of their current jobs had increased within the past two years, while just four per cent said they had decreased.

Morneau Shepell said 53 per cent of workers believed that talk therapy would be the best to help with their mental health issues, while 43 per cent wanted digital mindfulness or meditation and 38 per cent asked for cognitive behavioural therapy. About 39 per cent said they would consider taking medication to help.

As the second leading cause of workplace stress, money was top of mind for Canadian workers no matter how much they made. The survey found 42 per cent of employees thought they struggled more with finances than others who made the same amount of money.

Morneau Shepell said 36 per cent of workers believed financial stress hurt their productivity, while 24 per cent said it lessened their attendance.

But while money and employer-provided mental health supports were important, so was feeling a bond with coworkers.

The survey found 25 per cent of employees don’t feel connected to their workplace due to a lack of relationship with their coworkers. Mental health appeared to play a role, as 11 per cent of those with “excellent” mental health reported feeling isolated, compared to 47 per cent of those with poor mental health.


@katslepian

katya.slepian@bpdigital.ca

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

mental health

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

SFU Pipe Band comes to Chilliwack

Champion bagpipers will play on Leap Day

Agassiz Anglican Church hosts benefit dinner

Door prizes, entertainment and a catered dinner

LETTER: We’re all shook up

Harvey Andrew of Agassiz reminisces about earthquakes in a letter.

Barking news: Annual Pet Lover Show returns to Abbotsford!

Largest animal showcase in Western Canada brings fur and feather fun

Hockey 4: Simply for the love of hockey

No scores kept, no MVPs named — in Hope they just play for fun

VIDEO: Ottawa wants quick, peaceful resolution to pipeline protests, Trudeau says

The protests have manifested themselves as blockades on different rail lines across the country

B.C. budget expected to stay the course as economic growth moderates

Finance minister said ICBC costs have affected budget

Monday marks one-year anniversary of man missing from Langley

42-year-old B.C. man, Searl Smith, was last seen leaving Langley Memorial Hospital on Feb. 17, 2019

BC Ferries sailings filling up Family Day Monday

More than 20 sailings added between Swartz Bay and Tsawwassen for long weekend

Amtrak warns of delays as railways from Seattle to B.C. blocked by Wet’suwet’en supporters

Coastal GasLink said it’s signed benefits agreements with all 20 elected band councils along pipeline route

Federal emergency group meets on pipeline protests as rail blockades continue

There’s mounting political pressure for Trudeau to put an end to the blockades

VIDEO: Minister reports ‘modest progress’ after blockade talks with First Nation

Wet’suwet’en hereditary chiefs say Coastal GasLink does not have authority to go through their lands

B.C. man released from quarantined cruise ship in Japan

Because Spencer Fehrenbacher has American citizenship, he was evacuated by the U.S.

Most Read