Bright Nights kicks off its 20th year in Stanley Park

Bright Nights kicks off its 20th year in Stanley Park

About $1.4 million has been raised for the BC Professional Fire Fighters’ Burn Fund

In its 20th year, the Bright Nights in Stanley Park are back, with 3 million twinkling lights on display to benefit the BC Professional Fire Fighters’ Burn Fund.

On now until Jan. 6, attendees can visit the lights display while riding the Bright Nights Train or by walking through Train Plaza.

“It’s sure to delight kids, both young and old,” said Ray Boucher, burn fund vice-president and co-chair of the Bright Nights committee.

Displays include a Tree of Hope in memory of Abbotsford Const. John Davidson.

Behind the scenes, 800 fire fighters contribute about 8,000 hours during a three month period of set-up, operations and tear down.

READ MORE: Maple Ridge couple donate Christmas display to Bright Nights

“It’s a monumental undertaking of combined efforts to make this event so successful,” Boucher said in a statement.

A portions of ticket sales to ride the train, as well as donations made at the front gate and Train Plaza are earmarked for burn survivors and their families who rely on the burn fund for services such as the Young Burn Survivors Camp and research.

Since the event’s inception, more than 250,000 visitors have walked through the park and $1.4 million has been raised.

To kick off the opening of the displays Thursday, more than $185,000 was donated by dozens of charity groups and donors, including the BC Toy Association, Haunt of Edgemont and the Brenna Innes Memorial Soccer Tournament.

Charitable societies for more than 10 fire departments – including from Delta, Langley, Surrey and Kelowna – also made donations.

“The funds raised will make a huge difference to burn survivors and their families throughout our province,” Boucher said.

The burn fund is also encouraging visitors to show their generosity by bringing food items for the Greater Vancouver Food Bank Society.

Food bins will be on-site at the entrance gate.

Most needed items include:

  • canned meat and fish
  • natural peanut butter
  • whole wheat pasta or rice
  • pasta sauce
  • canned fruits/vegetables
  • 100 per cent fruit juices
  • low-sugar cereals
  • baby food, formula & diapers

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