Canadians are against a bulk buy of medication by the U.S., a poll suggest. (Sgt. Rodolfo E. Toro)

Most Canadians against Trump’s plan to send prescription drugs to U.S.: poll

79 per cent of Canadians said the country should focus on their own drug supply

The majority of Canadians don’t think it’s their responsibility to help the U.S. with drug costs or supply, a new survey suggests.

Thursday’s survey from the Angus Reid Institute comes after the Trump administration said it was setting up a system to allow wide-scale, bulk imports of prescription drugs from Canada.

Seventy-nine per cent of respondents said the country should focus on its own drug supply, and 78 per cent said they would support a national Pharmacare program – support for which was highest in lower-income families, and lowest in higher-income ones.

Another 64 per cent said they were concerned about the effect the U.S. policy could have on the Canadian drug supply. Results suggest 17 per cent already think there are “frequent” drug shortages, while 65 per cent believe the supply is “sufficient,” although still with drug shortages.

Forty per cent of Canadians say someone in their household has had trouble getting the medication they need – a figure that stayed similar throughout income ranges.

READ MORE: U.S. to set up plan allowing prescription drugs from Canada

READ MORE: Canada eyeing implications of U.S. plan to allow imports of prescription drugs


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katya.slepian@bpdigital.ca

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