Orphaned bear cub Casey rejoined siblings Dylan and Sumac in the care of the Northern Lights Wildlife Society following his recent rescue in the Shuswap. (Contributed)

Orphaned B.C. bear cub named after Snowbirds Capt. Jenn Casey

Neighbours assist in capture of Tappen Triplets now in care of Northern Lights Wildlife Society

An orphan bear cub rescued from the Shuswap area was named in honour of Canadian Force Snowbirds pilot Capt. Jenn Casey.

Casey the cub recently joined siblings Sumac and Dylan in the care of Angelika and Peter Langen with the Northern Lights Wildlife Society (NLWS) in Smithers, B.C. The effort to capture cubs with live traps took more than two weeks. It was overseen by an NLWS volunteer from Hope and assisted by concerned local residents.

“She drove up and set the traps and then the wonderful neighbourhood monitored, they reset it if necessary or they put fresh bait in, so that worked really well, and then they let her know when something got caught,” said Angelika, explaining the first cub was captured quickly, the second about a week later, and the third held out for 18 days before it was captured.

“The last one was in surprisingly good shape. We were really worried he would be really run down, but I guess with all the green growing right now he found enough sustenance to keep him going.”

Angelika said the siblings are doing well and have an excellent appetite.

The female cub, Sumac, was named after the road the three were caught on. Dylan, Angelika explained, was named after a “young gentleman” who was climbing all kinds of trees trying help with the rescue.

“The last one was named Casey in honour of the Snowbird that just perished in the accident,” said Angelika.

Affectionately known as the Tappen Triplets, the cubs will stay in the Langen’s care until June 2021 – when they would naturally leave their mother. At that point, they will be returned to the area.

During their time at Northern Lights, the cubs will be cared for by one person so as not to habituate them to humans.

“If you just have one caretaker they become kind of like the mother bear that in the wild teaches the cubs to stay away from other bears,” said Angelika. “In our case, he or she… would be teaching them to stay away from other humans. In the 30 years we’ve been doing this it’s been working really well.”

Northern Lights currently has 37 bears – 35 black bears and two grizzlies – in its care – cubs received last year that will be released this June.

Read more: VIDEO: Shuswap resident’s yard becomes nighttime thoroughfare for grizzlies

Read more: Two orphaned black bears returning home to Revelstoke

“And we have nine new cubs which is a record high for the end of May,” said Angelika.

The Langens are grateful for the help received in capturing and reuniting their young Shuswap guests.

“That was reason for celebration for us because we were worried we were going to lose them,” said Angelika. “I just came back from Mackenzie, there were three cubs there and by the time we got the call… we were there the next day and by that time a pair of eagles already had nabbed one of the triplets.

“It goes quick out there in the wild – it’s not always a nice place. So to get all three over that time frame was really a lot of luck and a lot of perseverence on those animals as well.

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter

bearsSalmon Arm

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

MP Vis advocates for faster internet in rural communities

Less than 45 per cent of rural households in Canada have high-speed internet

Peace on the water

Harrison Lake was rather serene recently with the lack of usual traffic… Continue reading

UPDATE: Police oversight agency investigating after shots fired Saturday night in Chilliwack neighbourhood

RCMP reported a ‘distraught male’ fired at police officers on Christina Drive – IIO is on scene Sunday

Prospera Credit Union, Westminster Savings lay off over 100 staff following historic merge

2020 merger was largest credit-union merger in Canadian history

Facing changes together: Your community, your journalists

The COVID-19 pandemic has changed the world in ways that would have… Continue reading

Kelowna man charged with harming a hamster

The 20-year-old Kelowna man faces several animal cruelty charges

High tech fish transport system set up to ‘whoosh’ salmon past Big Bar landslide

Fish will spend roughly 20 seconds inside the system, moving at roughly 20 metres per second

Trudeau to seek 10 days of paid sick leave for Canadian workers, says talks are ongoing

Paid sick leave is key to keeping COVID-19 spread under control, prime minister says

Snowbirds jets will not be leaving Kamloops, just yet

The Snowbirds have been in Kamloops since May 17 when a plane crashed killing Capt. Jennifer Casey

COVID-19 checkpoints ‘up to them,’ Bonnie Henry says of remote B.C. villages

Support local tourism economy, but only if you’re invited in

Vancouver Island hasn’t seen a new homegrown case of COVID-19 in two weeks

Island’s low and steady transmission rate chalked up to several factors

Eight people arrested in Victoria homeless camp after enforcement order issued

Those living in tents were given until May 20 to move indoors

Most Read