Canada exported fresh-cut Christmas trees worth $43.1 million in 2016, but also imported fake Christmas trees worth $61 million the same year, with $59.5 million coming from China. (Black Press file photo)

Canada exports fresh Christmas trees, imports fakes

Canadians imported $61 million worth of fake Christmas trees, despite having 1,872 Christmas tree farms throughout the country

One-thousand-eight-hundred-and-seventy-two.

That is the number of farms that grew Christmas trees in Canada in 2016. According to the 2016 Census of Agriculture, Quebec, Nova Scotia, Ontario, British Columbia and New Brunswick are the main ‘growing’ provinces.

Domestic sales of fresh-cut Christmas trees generated $77.6 million in farm cash receipts, and Canada is a net exporter of fresh-cut Christmas trees.

RELATED: POLL RESULTS: Fake Christmas tree vs. real Christmas tree

In 2016, Canada sent more than 1.95 million fresh-cut Christmas trees beyond its borders, generating $43.1 million in value. Surprisingly, most of the trees — about 1.866 million — went to the United States, not exactly a place short of trees. Their total value added up to $39.7 million. More surprisingly, Canada imported fresh-cut Christmas trees worth $5.1 million.

Looking beyond the United States, fresh-cut Canadian Christmas trees will stand in living rooms around the world, from the Caribbean to western Europe, Russia, the Philippines and Thailand. Even the United Arab Emirates and Venezuela bought Canadian trees.

RELATED: Sidney Sparkles parades through town Sunday

Among the provinces, Quebec leads all exporters by a mile, generating $27.4 million in value.

New Brunswick and Nova Scotia followed with $7.89 million and $7.2 million respectively. No other province had sales in excess of $475,000 (Ontario) with sales in B.C. barely topping $54,000.

PEI, Newfoundland and Labrador, Manitoba and Alberta exported zero trees.

But if Canada is a global leader in fresh-cut Christmas trees, Canadians are undermining this position by their choices.

Canadians imported artificial Christmas trees worth $61 million in 2016, with China accounting for $59.5 million.


Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter

wolfgang.depner@saanichnews.com

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

Rude awakening: 1.6-magnitude earthquake rouses residents from their sleep

The quake was detected 3 km east-northeast of Agassiz

Chilliwack Visual Artists Assocation calling for artists to display

Works will be on display at O’Connor Group Art Gallery

UPDATE: Jack-knifed semi closes Coquihalla northbound

A red liquid is reportedly spilled down the side of Highway 5

VIDEO: Mass coronavirus quarantines seen in China won’t happen in Canada, authorities say

‘If a case comes here, and it is probably … it will still be business as normal’

Canada slips in global corruption ranking in aftermath of SNC-Lavalin scandal

The country obtained a score of 77, which places it at the top in the Americas

Wuhan bans cars, Hong Kong closes schools as coronavirus spreads

Hong Kong leader Carrie Lam said her government will raise its response level to emergency, highest one

B.C.’s oldest practising lawyer celebrates 100th birthday, shares advice

Firefighters bring Constance Isherwood a cake with 100 birthday candles

Vernon woman suing McDonald’s for spilled coffee

Woman seeking nearly $10K, says employee failed to put lid on properly

5 things you need to know to start using ridesharing in Metro Vancouver

From how to get started to where drivers can take you, heres all you need to know

Diners’ health tax not catching on in B.C., restaurant group says

Small businesses look for options to cover employer health tax

B.C. comic wins judgment after club owner slaps cellphone out of his hands

Incident happened last summer when Garrett Clark was performing in Abbotsford

UPDATED: Mayors call for ‘calmness’ as highway rockslide cuts Tofino, Ucluelet off from supplies

Ministry of transportation expects to open road for “essential travel only” from noon-8 p.m. Friday.

Most Read