Manager Darcy Striker (left) with staff members Sydney Anderson

Secret to success for Lordco Auto Parts

As The Agassiz-Harrison Observer celebrates 25 years in the news business, we are taking some time to recognize other"25-year" moments.

Many businesses in Agassiz and Harrison have come and gone in the last 25 years. One that has stood the test of time is Lordco Auto Parts.

In one of the very first editions of the Agassiz-Harrison Observer, it was reported that Lordco was moving to a new location on Pioneer Ave. The business had opened its doors in 1984 but quickly outgrew the space. So in 1990, Lordco relocated. In an advertisement announcing the change, a younger Darcy Striker posed with his co-workers behind the counter at the new shop.

Striker was a new employee at the time, having started in October, 1989. Now, 25 years later he is the manager. Striker took some time out of his busy schedule to talk shop about the last quarter century.

He says the biggest change for Lordco as a business has been to adapt to the advancements in vehicles.

“Vehicles have changed dramatically,” he says.

Plugs, caps and rotors were common products sold for the carbureted, not fuel-injected vehicles of 25 years ago.

“You’ve got to get more creative; you can’t just sell car parts anymore,” he explains of changing business strategies.

Striker recalls the top-selling product in 1990 was probably a cap and rotor, and rattles off a couple parts numbers for the longstanding popular products. Now, it’s oil and air filters since that is one of the few things an average car owner can still fix on the higher-tech cars than those driven 25 years ago.

Lordco’s business comes primarily from automotive and industrial demands and, given the area, logging and agricultural needs as well.

Lordco has outlasted many other businesses, and is one of the few shops still on Pioneer Ave. in that very spot they moved to 25 years ago. So, what is their secret to success? One word: “Service.”

They work hard as a company to help each person who walks through the door, hopefully finding the part they need or working to get it for them.

To his valued customers, Striker says, “Thank you for supporting us all these years.”

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